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dc.contributor.advisorHeimberg, Richard G.
dc.creatorBlackmore, Michelle A.
dc.date.accessioned2020-10-20T13:33:37Z
dc.date.available2020-10-20T13:33:37Z
dc.date.issued2011
dc.identifier.other864885283
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12613/811
dc.description.abstractA core feature of GAD, excessive and uncontrollable worry, may be indicative of poor attentional control and difficulty disengaging attention from threatening or emotional information (e.g., Fox, 2004; Mathews, Fox, Yiend, & Calder, 2003; Yiend & Mathews 2001). The current study examined the performance of college students with and without self-reported GAD (N = 63) on measures of attentional control and a spatial cueing task designed to assess engagement-disengagement processes from emotionally valenced (aversive, pleasant) and neutral picture stimuli. Attentional control abilities were examined using the Stroop Color-Word Association Test (SCW Test) and Trail-Making Test (TMT). Separate analyses of variance (ANOVAs) demonstrated that GAD participants performed more poorly on the Stroop Color subtest and the TMT: Part B than non-GAD participants. Mixed ANOVAs of response times measured during the spatial cueing task revealed significant main effects for Cue Valence and Cue Validity, as well as several significant interactions of these variables with GAD status. The significant Cue Valence x Cue Validity x GAD status interaction indicated that GAD participants were slower to disengage their attention from aversive stimuli, relative to pleasant or neutral stimuli, than non-GAD participants who did not exhibit this bias. This interaction effect, however, did not remain significant upon covarying for depression. Together, these findings suggest that individuals with GAD evidence poorer attentional control and demonstrate difficulties disengaging from threatening stimuli compared to persons without the disorder. Impairment in these attentional processes may, therefore, contribute to the etiology and maintenance of GAD.
dc.format.extent94 pages
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherTemple University. Libraries
dc.relation.ispartofTheses and Dissertations
dc.rightsIN COPYRIGHT- This Rights Statement can be used for an Item that is in copyright. Using this statement implies that the organization making this Item available has determined that the Item is in copyright and either is the rights-holder, has obtained permission from the rights-holder(s) to make their Work(s) available, or makes the Item available under an exception or limitation to copyright (including Fair Use) that entitles it to make the Item available.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectPsychology
dc.subjectAttentional Bias
dc.subjectAttentional Control
dc.subjectDisengagement
dc.subjectGeneralized Anxiety Disorder
dc.subjectSpatial Cueing Task
dc.titleAttentional Bias for Affective Stimuli: Evaluation of Disengagement in Persons with and without Self-reported Generalized Anxiety Disorder
dc.typeText
dc.type.genreThesis/Dissertation
dc.contributor.committeememberGiovannetti, Tania
dc.contributor.committeememberFauber, Robert
dc.contributor.committeememberEllman, Lauren
dc.contributor.committeememberMcCloskey, Michael
dc.contributor.committeememberJohnson, Kareem
dc.description.departmentPsychology
dc.relation.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.34944/dspace/793
dc.ada.noteFor Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accommodation, including help with reading this content, please contact scholarshare@temple.edu
dc.description.degreePh.D.
refterms.dateFOA2020-10-20T13:33:37Z


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