TUScholarShare

TUScholarShare

TUScholarShare is a service to support the needs of the Temple University community around sharing, promoting, and archiving the wide range of scholarly works created in the course of research and teaching. The repository aims to make Temple scholarship freely available online to a global audience, with the goal of advancing knowledge and learning.

 

                                                   

 

Depositing your work to TUScholarShare is as simple as selecting one of the options above. We provide a variety of services to support you and your scholarship, and we will deposit your work on your behalf. Visit our Help for Depositors page to learn more. 

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  • ACES and Built Environment Scoping Review Search Strategy

    Zisman-Ilani, Yaara; Baishya, Mona; Roth, Stephanie (2022-09)
    To identify studies to include or consider for this scoping review, the review team worked with a medical librarian (SR) to develop detailed search strategies for each database. The PRISMA-S extension was followed for search reporting. The medical librarian (SR) developed the search for PubMed (NLM) and translated the search for every database searched. The PubMed (NLM) search strategy was reviewed by the research team to check for accuracy and term relevancy, and all final searches were peer-reviewed by another medical librarian following the PRESS checklist. The databases included in this search are PubMed (NLM), Embase (Elsevier), Web of Science (Clarivate Analytics), Cochrane Central (Wiley), PsycInfo (EbscoHost) and CINAHL (EbscoHost) using a combination of keywords and subject headings. A grey literature search included a clinical trials registry (clinicaltrials.gov) and the TRIP Pro medical database (tripdatabase.com) website. There were no limits to the search. All final searches were performed on June 2, 2022 by the librarian and were fully reported (SR).
  • Social influence on Tobacco Use in Sexual and Gender Minority Populations Search Strategy

    Wheldon, Christopher; Daugherty, Ava; Nace, Travis (2022-09)
    To identify studies to include or consider for this rapid review, the review team worked with a medical librarian (TN) to develop detailed search strategies for each database. The PRISMA-S extension was followed for search reporting. The medical librarian (TN) developed the search for PubMed (NLM) and translated the search for every database searched. The PubMed (NLM) search strategy was reviewed by the research team to check for accuracy and term relevancy, and all final searches were peer-reviewed by another medical librarian following the PRESS Peer Review of Electronic Search Strategies checklist. The Transgender search hedge used in this search was borrowed from the Library Resources for Transgender Topics libguide (1). The databases included in this search are PubMed (NLM), PsycInfo (EbscoHost), Applied Social Sciences Index & Abstracts (ProQuest), and Cochrane CENTRAL (Wiley) using a combination of keywords and subject headings. A grey literature search included the clinical trials registries (clinicaltrials.gov) and WHO ICTRP (https://trialsearch.who.int/), MedRxiv (https://medrxiv.org) and the TRIP Pro medical database (tripdatabase.com) websites. No limits were used in this search. All final searches were performed on June 29, 2022 by the librarian and were fully reported (TN). The full search strategies as reported by the librarian are provided in Appendix.
  • Characteristics of NCAA Conference of Codes of Ethics

    Greenwell, T. Christopher; Geist, Alan L.; Mahony, Daniel F.; Jordan, Jeremy S.; Pastore, Donna L. (2001)
  • Factors Affecting Response Rates in Survey Research: The Case of Intercollegiate Coaches

    Turner, Brian A.; Jordan, Jeremy S.; Sagas, Michael (2006)
    A common challenge when conducting survey research is obtaining an adequate number of completed questionnaires from a chosen sample. The present study examined four factors (timing, salience, oversampling, and population characteristics) deemed to be most likely to influence response rates when utilizing the population of intercollegiate coaches. A stratified, random sample of NCAA coaches from six sports at each division level was selected (n = 2964). A total of 1096 (37.0%) questionnaires were returned. Results indicated a significant difference in response rates based on time of the season sent and sport, with football reporting the highest response rates. On average, coaches receive four requests for participation in research studies per year. Finally, coaches felt that research on their profession was only somewhat important.

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