TUScholarShare

TUScholarShare is a service to support the needs of the Temple University community around sharing, promoting, and archiving the wide range of scholarly works created in the course of research and teaching. The repository aims to make Temple scholarship freely available online to a global audience, with the goal of advancing knowledge and learning.

 

                                                   

 

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  • Search Strategies for Systematic Review of Ear Disease & Ear Abnormalities

    Roth, Stephanie; Sulibhavi, Anita (2021-01-21)
    To identify studies to include or consider for this systematic review, the review team worked with a medical librarian to develop detailed search strategies for each database. The search resulted in 15,188 studies (281 from grey literature sources). 2,165 duplicate studies were found and omitted using Endnote 20 for the deduplication of records and 13,023 references were eligible to screen. Studies were screened by title and abstract by two blinded and independent reviewers. If a tiebreaker was needed, a third reviewer was called in. This process was repeated for full text article screening and article selection.
  • Peer Support IDD Scoping Review Search

    Roth, Stephanie; Pfeiffer, Beth; Weiss, K. Eva; Aleong, Shawn; Karp, Laura (2022-01-21)
    To identify studies to include or consider for this systematic review, the review team worked with a medical librarian to develop detailed search strategies for each database. The search resulted in 1,986 studies (210 from grey literature sources). 279 duplicate studies were found and omitted using Endnote 20 for the deduplication of records and 1,707 references were eligible to screen. Studies were screened by title and abstract by two blinded and independent reviewers. If a tiebreaker was needed, a third reviewer was called in. This process was repeated for full text article screening and article selection.
  • Syllabus: Research Methods, AOD 2201 (Spring 2022)

    Winfield, Jake; Winfield|0000-0001-6181-8664 (2022-01)
  • 3D Printed Arteries: Making Cardiovascular Anatomy Tangible & Accessible

    Perilli, Nicholas (2021-12-01)
    With accessible 3D printed models of a patient’s coronary arteries, makerspace librarians assisted cardiovascular fellows in understanding coronary fluoroscopic anatomy and improved accessibility to such teaching aids.
  • Unprotected peptide macrocyclization and stapling via a fluorine-thiol displacement reaction

    Islam, Md Shafiqul; Junod, Samuel L.; Zhang, Si; Buuh, Zakey Yusuf; Guan, Yifu; Zhao, Mi; Kaneria, Kishan H.; Kafley, Parmila; Cohen, Carson; Maloney, Robert; Lyu, Zhigang; Voelz, Vincent A.; Yang, Weidong; Wang, Rongsheng; Wang|0000-0002-5749-7447 (2022-01-17)
    We report the discovery of a facile peptide macrocyclization and stapling strategy based on a fluorine thiol displacement reaction (FTDR), which renders a class of peptide analogues with enhanced stability, affinity, cellular uptake, and inhibition of cancer cells. This approach enabled selective modification of the orthogonal fluoroacetamide side chains in unprotected peptides in the presence of intrinsic cysteines. The identified benzenedimethanethiol linker greatly promoted the alpha helicity of a variety of peptide substrates, as corroborated by molecular dynamics simulations. The cellular uptake of benzenedimethanethiol stapled peptides appeared to be universally enhanced compared to the classic ring-closing metathesis (RCM) stapled peptides. Pilot mechanism studies suggested that the uptake of FTDR-stapled peptides may involve multiple endocytosis pathways in a distinct pattern in comparison to peptides stapled by RCM. Consistent with the improved cell permeability, the FTDR-stapled lead Axin and p53 peptide analogues demonstrated enhanced inhibition of cancer cells over the RCM-stapled analogues and the unstapled peptides.

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