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dc.contributor.advisorKendall, Philip C.
dc.creatorFrank, Hannah
dc.date.accessioned2020-08-25T19:51:13Z
dc.date.available2020-08-25T19:51:13Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12613/263
dc.description.abstractBackground: Although exposure is considered an active ingredient in evidence-based treatments (EBTs) for anxiety, it is infrequently used in routine clinical care settings. Therapist-level barriers to the use of exposure include inadequate training and negative beliefs about exposure. Prior efforts to train therapists in exposure therapy have resulted in knowledge but not behavior change. This study employed a novel training strategy, experiential learning, designed to improve the translation of knowledge into clinical practice. This study’s aims were to assess the feasibility and acceptability of experiential training (ET), as well as to conduct exploratory inferential analyses examining knowledge, attitudes, and use of exposure following training. Methods: Participants included 28 therapists working in routine clinical care settings. They were randomized to one of two conditions to learn about exposure therapy: training as usual (TAU) or ET (i.e., undergoing a one-session treatment for fear of spiders). Both workshops lasted one day, and participants were expected to attend weekly consultation calls for three months after training. Qualitative interviews were conducted at the end of the consultation call period. Results: The ET was feasible and acceptable to participants. Qualitative interviews suggested that participants, including those who were fearful of spiders, had a positive response to the training and found it to be useful. Quantitative analyses found that there was a significantly greater increase in the number of exposures used following ET than TAU at 1-month follow up. Both conditions demonstrated significant increases in knowledge, attitudes toward exposures, and self-efficacy following the training. Conclusions: The findings suggest that, consistent with previous research, a one-day training resulted in significant improvements in therapist-level factors that may affect the use of exposure. In addition, there is initial evidence that ET resulted in greater use of exposure after training, which applied more broadly, could increase the number of clients receiving an EBT for anxiety. The results provide promising evidence for the utility and acceptability of ET as a strategy to increase the use of EBTs in clinical practice.
dc.format.extent157 pages
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherTemple University. Libraries
dc.relation.ispartofTheses and Dissertations
dc.rightsIN COPYRIGHT- This Rights Statement can be used for an Item that is in copyright. Using this statement implies that the organization making this Item available has determined that the Item is in copyright and either is the rights-holder, has obtained permission from the rights-holder(s) to make their Work(s) available, or makes the Item available under an exception or limitation to copyright (including Fair Use) that entitles it to make the Item available.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectMental Health
dc.subjectPsychology
dc.subjectAnxiety
dc.subjectDissemination
dc.subjectExposure Therapy
dc.subjectImplementation
dc.subjectTherapist Training
dc.titleDissemination of exposure-based treatment for anxiety: Experiential training for community therapists
dc.typeText
dc.type.genreThesis/Dissertation
dc.contributor.committeememberOlino, Thomas
dc.contributor.committeememberHeimberg, Richard G.
dc.contributor.committeememberGiovannetti, Tania
dc.contributor.committeememberAlloy, Lauren B.
dc.contributor.committeememberKratz, Hilary
dc.description.departmentPsychology
dc.relation.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.34944/dspace/247
dc.ada.noteFor Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accommodation, including help with reading this content, please contact scholarshare@temple.edu
dc.description.degreePh.D.
dc.identifier.proqst13770
dc.creator.orcid0000-0003-2396-4585
dc.date.updated2020-08-18T19:03:44Z
dc.embargo.lift08/18/2022
dc.identifier.filenameFrank_temple_0225E_13770.pdf


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