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dc.contributor.advisorBeglar, David
dc.creatorOgawa, Chie
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-02T14:46:21Z
dc.date.available2020-11-02T14:46:21Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12613/2043
dc.description.abstractThis study was an exploration of the effects of a pedagogical intervention on the development of Japanese university students’ oral performances. In task-based language teaching (TBLT), developing speaking proficiency is a major learning goal. However, research examining the effect of a focus on linguistic form in TBLT is limited. One way to balance communication and attention to linguistic form in TBLT is to add form-focused instruction to the communicative tasks. This study is an exploration of the longitudinal effects of form-focused instruction in a speaking task on the development of speaking proficiency. The current study was conducted for the following research purposes. The first purpose was to explore the longitudinal development of CALF (complexity, accuracy, lexis, and fluency) through form-focused intervention. A one-semester form-focused intervention was conducted to investigate how L2 learners develop or change their linguistic performance as measured by the CALF variables. The second purpose was to explore proceduralization through the 3/2/1 task. The third purpose was to investigate the relationship between communicative adequacy and CALF in the 3/2/1 task. This purpose was addressed by comparing human raters’ perceptions of communicative adequacy with the CALF analyses. The final purpose was to qualitatively investigate what the participants prioritized during their task performances. The participants were 48 first-year Japanese university students attending a private university in eastern Japan. A shortened version of the 4/3/2 task, the 3/2/1 task, was implemented 10 times for 13 weeks in one academic semester. In the 3/2/1 task, students talk about the same topic for 3 minutes, then 2 minutes, and finally 1 minute. The participants were divided into three groups: the comparison group, the teacher-led group, and the teacher and peer group. Two types of form-focused instruction were implemented, teacher-led planning and a peer-check activity. The participants in the comparison group started the 3/2/1 speaking task immediately, those in the teacher-led group read a teacher-model passage with the target formulaic language underlined prior to beginning the 3/2/1 task, and those in the teacher and peer group received a peer-check treatment while doing the 3/2/1 task in addition to teacher-led planning. Listener partners checked to see if the speakers used the target formulaic language during the 3/2/1 task. The target forms were (a) stating opinions (e.g., In my opinion), (b) giving reasons (e.g., It is mainly because…), (c) giving examples (For example…), and (d) expressing possibilities (If…). Speaking data were collected at Time 1 (Week 2), Time 2 (Week 8), and Time 3 (Week 14), transcribed, and analyzed for syntactic complexity, morphosyntactic accuracy, lexical diversity, fluency and communicative adequacy. This result showed that form-focused instruction with the target formulaic language improved the Japanese university students’ speaking fluency such as mean length of run and phonation time ratio. The participants also improved human raters’ perceptions of communicative adequacy over one academic semester. There was a significant and strong positive relationship between utterance fluency and human raters’ evaluation of communicative adequacy. In addition, the peer-check enhanced the learners’ usage of a wider variety of the target formulaic language. The results indicated that including formulaic language instruction can enhance learners’ mean length of run, which is a measure of speaking fluency, while teacher-led planning can help learners notice target forms. The peer-check can pressure learners to use the target forms during the 3/2/1 task and provide feedback so that speakers know what form should be used in the next 3/2/1 task performance. Suggestions for future studies regarding the use of formulaic language in TBLT tasks are proposed.
dc.format.extent326 pages
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherTemple University. Libraries
dc.relation.ispartofTheses and Dissertations
dc.rightsIN COPYRIGHT- This Rights Statement can be used for an Item that is in copyright. Using this statement implies that the organization making this Item available has determined that the Item is in copyright and either is the rights-holder, has obtained permission from the rights-holder(s) to make their Work(s) available, or makes the Item available under an exception or limitation to copyright (including Fair Use) that entitles it to make the Item available.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectEducation
dc.subjectSecond Language Acquisition
dc.subjectSecond Language Speaking
dc.subjectSpeaking Assessment
dc.titleA ONE-SEMESTER FORM-FOCUSED INTERVENTION ON THE DEVELOPMENT OF SPEAKING PROFICIENCY
dc.typeText
dc.type.genreThesis/Dissertation
dc.contributor.committeememberNemoto, Tomoko
dc.contributor.committeememberLeeming, Ian Paul
dc.contributor.committeememberDoe, Timothy
dc.description.departmentTeaching & Learning
dc.relation.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.34944/dspace/2025
dc.ada.noteFor Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accommodation, including help with reading this content, please contact scholarshare@temple.edu
dc.description.degreePh.D.
refterms.dateFOA2020-11-02T14:46:21Z


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