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dc.contributor.advisorDrabick, Deborah A. G.
dc.creatorCline, Jessie Irit
dc.date.accessioned2020-10-21T14:27:06Z
dc.date.available2020-10-21T14:27:06Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.other864885807
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12613/982
dc.description.abstractAlthough the current literature demonstrates relations between autonomic nervous system (ANS) functioning and conduct disorder (CD), there are inconsistencies across studies in the magnitude and direction of these associations, some of which may stem from heterogeneity within the CD diagnostic category. Considering callous-unemotional (CU) traits in research examining ANS functioning and CD relations could help to clarify these inconsistencies, given that CU traits identify a subgroup of youth with CD who exhibit a more severe and persistent course, as well as more negative correlates and sequelae than youth with CD without CU traits. However, there is a dearth of literature considering ANS processes among youth with CD with and without CU traits. Examining these relations, particularly during middle childhood when these processes may be amenable to intervention, has important implications for etiological, prevention, and intervention models. The present study examined relations among CD, CU, and ANS functioning among a sample of ethnic minority, urban children (N= 99, M= 9.87± 1.19 years old; 48.5% male; 94.9% African-American, 3% Latino/a). Specifically, I examined whether CU traits moderated the relations between CD and (a) parasympathetic nervous system (PNS) functioning and (b) sympathetic nervous system (SNS) functioning. In addition, I examined whether parenting behaviors (i.e., harsh parental discipline and parental warmth/involvement) influenced the relations between (a) CD and ANS functioning, and (b) CU and ANS functioning. Findings demonstrated that PNS functioning differed among children with high and low levels of CD symptoms depending on levels of CU traits. Within the current sample, among children with higher levels of CD symptoms, those with (a) higher CU symptom severity exhibited lower baseline respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) and lower RSA reactivity (PNS withdrawal), compared to those with (b) lower CU symptom severity who demonstrated higher baseline RSA and higher RSA reactivity (PNS activation). Among children with lower CD symptom severity, those with (a) higher CU symptom severity exhibited higher baseline RSA and higher RSA reactivity, compared to those with (b) lower CU symptom severity who evidenced lower baseline RSA and lower RSA reactivity. Neither harsh parental discipline nor parental warmth/involvement moderated the relations between (a) CD and ANS functioning and (b) CU and ANS functioning. However, there were marginally significant associations between baseline RSA and (a) harsh parental discipline and (b) parental warmth/involvement, as well as between RSA reactivity and parental warmth/involvement in analyses examining CD, parenting, and ANS functioning. Furthermore, parental warmth/involvement tended to be associated with RSA reactivity in the analyses examining CU, parenting, and ANS functioning. Results have implications for facilitating the identification of children at risk for developing more pernicious subtypes of behavior problems, and contribute important information for the development of more individualized and potentially effective interventions for youth behavior problems, particularly among high-risk youth.
dc.format.extent159 pages
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherTemple University. Libraries
dc.relation.ispartofTheses and Dissertations
dc.rightsIN COPYRIGHT- This Rights Statement can be used for an Item that is in copyright. Using this statement implies that the organization making this Item available has determined that the Item is in copyright and either is the rights-holder, has obtained permission from the rights-holder(s) to make their Work(s) available, or makes the Item available under an exception or limitation to copyright (including Fair Use) that entitles it to make the Item available.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectPsychology
dc.titleAutonomic Nervous System Functioning and Callous-Unemotional Traits in Childhood-Onset Conduct Disorder
dc.typeText
dc.type.genreThesis/Dissertation
dc.contributor.committeememberMarshall, Peter J.
dc.contributor.committeememberMcCloskey, Michael
dc.contributor.committeememberXie, Hongling
dc.contributor.committeememberTaylor, Ronald D.
dc.contributor.committeememberGiovannetti, Tania
dc.description.departmentPsychology
dc.relation.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.34944/dspace/964
dc.ada.noteFor Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accommodation, including help with reading this content, please contact scholarshare@temple.edu
dc.description.degreePh.D.
refterms.dateFOA2020-10-21T14:27:06Z


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