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dc.contributor.advisorWhelan, Kelly A.
dc.creatorPark, Pyoung Hwa
dc.date.accessioned2024-01-11T21:45:05Z
dc.date.available2024-01-11T21:45:05Z
dc.date.issued2023-12
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12613/9547
dc.description.abstractThe CpG Island Methylator Phenotype (CIMP) is a distinct form of aberrant DNA methylation in cancer, and it is seen in 20-40% of colorectal cancers (CRC) where its causes remain elusive. Intestinal microbiota represents an important environmental component implicated in CRC development. Interestingly, microbiota have been shown to modulate DNA methylation in preclinical models but the relationship between tumor-infiltrating bacteria and CIMP status in currently unknown. Our hypothesis is that the gut microbiota affects colonic neoplasia through modulating aberrant DNA methylation in host epigenome. To test this hypothesis, we analyzed CIMP status in CRC patient tumor samples. We used a genome-wide approach to determine the CIMP status by filtering cancer-related sites. A total of 1317 CpG sites were filtered and used to determine distinct CIMP classifications that aligned with well-known characteristics of CIMP cases, including localization in the proximal colon, a higher prevalence in female patients, and a higher frequency of MLH1 hypermethylation. To study the association between CIMP and the gut microbiota, we analyzed the enrichment of four bacterial species associated with CRC, including Bacteroides fragilis, Escherichia coli, Fusobacterium nucleatum, and Klebsiella pneumoniae. Notably, they exhibited higher enrichment in CIMP-Positive tumor samples, except for E. coli. This analysis also identified a group of samples referred to as bacterial "Superhigh," characterized by remarkably high abundances of these three bacterial species. The bacterial Superhigh cases displayed a significant association with CIMP status and MLH1 methylation. We validated the association between the CRC-associated bacteria and CIMP by analyzing the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) 450K methylation array data and whole exome sequencing data. The analysis demonstrated that bacterial Superhigh cases in the TCGA datasets also had significantly higher odds of being CIMP-Positive and having MLH1 methylation. To expand our investigation, we conducted 16S rRNA gene sequencing to identify additional bacterial taxa linked to CIMP. Numerous bacterial genera and species were found to be enriched in CRC tumor tissues, with specific enrichments in CIMP-Positive and CIMP-High groups. Notably, Bergeyella, Campylobacter concisus, and Fusobacterium canifelinum were significantly enriched in CIMP-Positive tumors. Additionally, I studied the causal relationship between gut microbiota and CpG island methylation by colonizing germ-free mice ApcMinΔ850/+;Il10–/– with E. coli NC101 & K. pneumoniae, specific pathogen free bacteria, and the mouse bacterial Consortium. Differential methylation analyses of adjacent normal colon tissue revealed a pronounced tissue side-specific difference, particularly in non-CpG island regions. The tissue specificity diminished with the increasing tumorigenic potential of the microbiota group. Comparisons between microbiota groups and germ-free mice indicated a more significant increase in methylation within CpG islands when gut microbiota with higher tumorigenic potential was present. In conclusion, our study underscores the association between CIMP in CRC and the gut microbiota and the causal relationship between the cut microbiota and CpG island methylation. It highlights specific bacterial taxa that may impact DNA methylation especially in CpG islands and contribute to the development ang progression of CIMP in colorectal cancer.
dc.format.extent96 pages
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherTemple University. Libraries
dc.relation.ispartofTheses and Dissertations
dc.rightsIN COPYRIGHT- This Rights Statement can be used for an Item that is in copyright. Using this statement implies that the organization making this Item available has determined that the Item is in copyright and either is the rights-holder, has obtained permission from the rights-holder(s) to make their Work(s) available, or makes the Item available under an exception or limitation to copyright (including Fair Use) that entitles it to make the Item available.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectGenetics
dc.subjectOncology
dc.subjectCancer biology
dc.subjectColorectal cancer
dc.subjectDNA methylation
dc.subjectEpigenetics
dc.subjectGut microbiota
dc.titleImpact of the gut microbiota on DNA methylation in colorectal cancer
dc.typeText
dc.type.genreThesis/Dissertation
dc.contributor.committeememberIssa, Jean-Pierre
dc.contributor.committeememberSapienza, Carmen
dc.contributor.committeememberTükel, Çagla
dc.contributor.committeememberTempera, Italo
dc.description.departmentBiomedical Sciences
dc.relation.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.34944/dspace/9509
dc.ada.noteFor Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accommodation, including help with reading this content, please contact scholarshare@temple.edu
dc.description.degreePh.D.
dc.identifier.proqst15495
dc.creator.orcid0000-0002-5850-6181
dc.date.updated2024-01-09T14:05:45Z
refterms.dateFOA2024-01-11T21:45:06Z
dc.identifier.filenamePark_temple_0225E_15495.pdf


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