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dc.contributor.advisorJones, Nora L.
dc.contributor.advisorAverill, Catherine
dc.creatorArmstead, Valerie
dc.date.accessioned2024-01-11T21:18:50Z
dc.date.available2024-01-11T21:18:50Z
dc.date.issued2023-12
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12613/9515
dc.description.abstractCurrently only 5.7% of physicians in the United States (U.S.) are Black/African American. This comprehensive analysis explores the significant underrepresentation of Black/African American physicians in the United States, a problem that has persisted for over 100 years. This investigation traces this disparity back to the Flexner report, a document that revolutionized medical education for the benefit of the white population but to the detriment of Black and other vulnerable populations. There is a critical examination of the ethical implications of the Flexner report, arguing that it has contributed to health disparities resulting in shortened lives for Black men, women, and children. Moreover, the roles played by private institutions such as the Carnegie Foundation, the Rockefeller Foundation, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education and the American Medical Association and the U.S. federal government in initiating, funding or upholding the changes resulting from Flexner’s report are delineated. Most importantly, the efforts, as a result of the formation of the National Medical Association to overcome the obstacles placed in front of Black healthcare providers in caring for people of color is revealed. In exposing the damage done to physicians and patients of color there are also proposals of solutions to reverse the ethical harm done because of the Flexner report's implementation, including reparations for Black healthcare providers and patients adversely affected by the Flexner report. In conclusion there is an in-depth analysis of the history and impact of the Flexner report, the ethical and moral imperatives of reparations, and the feasibility and potential impact of these reparations.
dc.format.extent52 pages
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherTemple University. Libraries
dc.relation.ispartofTheses and Dissertations
dc.rightsIN COPYRIGHT- This Rights Statement can be used for an Item that is in copyright. Using this statement implies that the organization making this Item available has determined that the Item is in copyright and either is the rights-holder, has obtained permission from the rights-holder(s) to make their Work(s) available, or makes the Item available under an exception or limitation to copyright (including Fair Use) that entitles it to make the Item available.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectMedical ethics
dc.subjectMedicine
dc.subjectPublic health
dc.subjectFlexner report
dc.subjectHealth care disparities
dc.subjectMedical ethics
dc.subjectPublic health
dc.subjectSocial determinants of health
dc.subjectUrban bioethics
dc.titleREPARATIONS FOR CONTEMPORARY BLACK HEALTH CARE PROVIDERS AND PATIENTS ADVERSELY AFFECTED BY THE FLEXNER REPORT
dc.typeText
dc.type.genreThesis/Dissertation
dc.contributor.committeememberAverill, Catherine
dc.description.departmentUrban Bioethics
dc.relation.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.34944/dspace/9477
dc.ada.noteFor Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accommodation, including help with reading this content, please contact scholarshare@temple.edu
dc.description.degreeM.A.
dc.identifier.proqst15469
dc.creator.orcid0000-0001-7429-0416
dc.date.updated2024-01-09T14:05:11Z
refterms.dateFOA2024-01-11T21:19:13Z
dc.identifier.filenameArmstead_temple_0225M_15469.pdf


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