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dc.contributor.advisorPauwels, Erin Kristl
dc.creatorKearis, Kedra
dc.date.accessioned2024-01-11T21:16:20Z
dc.date.available2024-01-11T21:16:20Z
dc.date.issued2023-12
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12613/9513
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation examines portrait production during the global Gilded Age in the United States, revealing an interplay between cosmopolitanism and revivalism. Using a transnational and multi-media framework, it broadens conventional definitions of portraiture, allowing American women to be centered within the study not only as subjects, but also as patrons of art. The project demonstrates that the apparently anti-modern strain of revivalism characteristic of late nineteenth century art emerged as a reflection of US expansionist ideologies. This goal is accomplished through a series of illustrative case studies, including a discussion of Gilded Age costume balls, organized by wealthy American women, that visualized the imperial courts of pre-industrial Europe in order to legitimize their social positions. Another investigation considers the Paris studio contents of American painter John Singer Sargent, which brought his iconic painting Madame X into exhibitionary dialogue with collected Japanese export goods, as emblems of the artist’s cosmopolitan brand of empire. An analysis of society leader Alva Vanderbilt’s Pompadour bedroom by French designer Jules Allard reveals a blend of pre-industrial style produced with modern technologies, making it a space worthy of her imperial ambitions. Finally, the study examines society matriarch Alice Vanderbilt’s paradoxical Victorianism and Modernism in the context of her portrait collection. Overall, the project illuminates new definitions of cosmopolitanism and its cultural significance during the Gilded Age and considers the collaboration between female patrons and artists, placing them within the context of media circulation and a global art market where women could curate and claim their own brand of identity, one expressive of a global reaching American empire in the late nineteenth-century.
dc.format.extent345 pages
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherTemple University. Libraries
dc.relation.ispartofTheses and Dissertations
dc.rightsIN COPYRIGHT- This Rights Statement can be used for an Item that is in copyright. Using this statement implies that the organization making this Item available has determined that the Item is in copyright and either is the rights-holder, has obtained permission from the rights-holder(s) to make their Work(s) available, or makes the Item available under an exception or limitation to copyright (including Fair Use) that entitles it to make the Item available.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectArt history
dc.subjectArt criticism
dc.subjectWomen's studies
dc.subjectHistory - 19th century
dc.subjectPortraits
dc.subjectWomen art collectors
dc.subjectWomen art patrons
dc.titlePortrait Collateral: Cosmopolitan Self-Fashioning in the Global Gilded Age, 1876-1920
dc.typeText
dc.type.genreThesis/Dissertation
dc.contributor.committeememberAlvarez, Mariola V.
dc.contributor.committeememberDolan, Therese, 1946-
dc.contributor.committeememberLucy, Martha
dc.description.departmentArt History
dc.relation.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.34944/dspace/9475
dc.ada.noteFor Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accommodation, including help with reading this content, please contact scholarshare@temple.edu
dc.description.degreePh.D.
dc.identifier.proqst15527
dc.creator.orcid0000-0002-1145-4329
dc.date.updated2024-01-09T14:06:36Z
dc.embargo.lift01/09/2026
dc.identifier.filenameKearis_temple_0225E_15527.pdf


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