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dc.creatorScalise, Nicole R.
dc.creatorDePascale, Mary
dc.creatorTavassolie, Nadia
dc.creatorMcCown, Claire
dc.creatorRamani, Geetha B.
dc.date.accessioned2024-01-03T20:46:19Z
dc.date.available2024-01-03T20:46:19Z
dc.date.issued2022-03-09
dc.identifier.citationScalise, N.R.; DePascale, M.; Tavassolie, N.; McCown, C.; Ramani, G.B. Deal Me in: Playing Cards in the Home to Learn Math. Educ. Sci. 2022, 12, 190. https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci12030190
dc.identifier.issn2227-7102
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12613/9488
dc.description.abstractRecent meta-analyses have demonstrated a significant association between children’s early math achievement and their experiences with math at home, including their caregivers’ talk about math. However, few studies have investigated the relations between caregiver math talk and children’s learning with experimental designs. Eighty-six children (M = 5.0 years) and their caregivers were randomly assigned to play either a numeracy or a shape card game at home for six weeks. Data were collected on children’s number and shape knowledge and families’ math talk during gameplay. There was substantial participant attrition (42% did not return completed materials), however, both an intent-to-treat analysis of the sample that received study materials and a subgroup analysis of study completers showed that children who played the shape game significantly improved their shape naming and matching skills relative to children who played the number game. Children who played the number game did not significantly improve their numerical skills relative to children who played the shape game. Mathematical talk during gameplay varied between families but was correlated over time within families. Caregivers’ and children’s talk about matching cards by shape or color predicted children’s learning from the shape game. The results suggest that despite receiving uniform instructions and materials, there was significant variability in children’s home math experiences that predicted their learning from the card game.
dc.format.extent17 pages
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofFaculty/ Researcher Works
dc.relation.haspartEducation Sciences, Vol. 12, Iss. 3
dc.relation.isreferencedbyMDPI
dc.rightsAttribution CC BY
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectHome mathematics environment
dc.subjectMathematical talk
dc.subjectMathematics
dc.subjectNumeracy
dc.subjectGeometry
dc.titleDeal Me in: Playing Cards in the Home to Learn Math
dc.typeText
dc.type.genreJournal article
dc.description.departmentPsychology and Neuroscience
dc.relation.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.3390/educsci12030190
dc.ada.noteFor Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accommodation, including help with reading this content, please contact scholarshare@temple.edu
dc.description.schoolcollegeTemple University. College of Liberal Arts
dc.temple.creatorTavassolie, Nadia
refterms.dateFOA2024-01-03T20:46:19Z


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