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dc.creatorGallo, Caitlin A.
dc.creatorDesrochers, Gabrielle N.
dc.creatorMorris, Garett J.
dc.creatorRumney, Chad D.
dc.creatorSandell, Sydney J.
dc.creatorMcDevitt, Jane K.
dc.creatorLangford, Dianne
dc.creatorRosene, John M.
dc.date.accessioned2023-12-21T19:36:58Z
dc.date.available2023-12-21T19:36:58Z
dc.date.issued2022-02-15
dc.identifier.citationCaitlin A. Gallo, Gabrielle N. Desrochers, Garett J. Morris, Chad D. Rumney, Sydney J. Sandell, Jane K. McDevitt, Dianne Langford, John M. Rosene. (2022) Sex Differences in Neck Strength Force and Activation Patterns in Collegiate Contact Sport. Journal of Sports Science and Medicine (21), 68 - 73. https://doi.org/10.52082/jssm.2022.68
dc.identifier.issn1303-2968
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12613/9366
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to assess changes in cervical musculature throughout contact-heavy collegiate ice hockey practices during a regular season of NCAA Division III ice hockey teams. In this cross-sectional study, 36 (male n = 13; female n = 23) ice hockey players participated. Data were collected over 3 testing sessions (baseline; pre-practice; post-practice). Neck circumference, neck length, head-neck segment length, isometric strength and electromyography (EMG) activity for flexion and extension were assessed. Assessments were completed approximately 1h before a contact-heavy practice and 15 min after practice. For sternocleidomastoid (SCM) muscles, males had significantly greater peak force and greater time to peak force versus females. For both left and right SCMs, both sexes had significantly greater peak EMG activity pre-practice versus baseline, and right (dominant side) SCM time to peak EMG activity was decreased post-practice compared to pre-practice. There were no significant differences for EMG activity of the upper trapezius musculature, over time or between sexes. Sex differences observed in SCM force and activation patterns of the dominant side SCM may contribute to head stabilization during head impacts. Our study is the first investigation to report changes in cervical muscle strength in men’s and women’s ice hockey players in the practical setting.
dc.format.extent6 pages
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofFaculty/ Researcher Works
dc.relation.haspartJournal of Sports Science & Medicine, Vol. 21
dc.relation.isreferencedbyUniversity of Uludag, Türkiye
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs CC BY-NC-ND
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.subjectIce hockey
dc.subjectSternocleidomastoid
dc.subjectSex differences
dc.subjectNeck strength
dc.titleSex Differences in Neck Strength Force and Activation Patterns in Collegiate Contact Sport
dc.typeText
dc.type.genreJournal article
dc.description.departmentHealth and Rehabilitation Sciences
dc.description.departmentPsychology and Neuroscience
dc.relation.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.52082/jssm.2022.68
dc.ada.noteFor Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accommodation, including help with reading this content, please contact scholarshare@temple.edu
dc.description.schoolcollegeTemple University. College of Public Health
dc.description.schoolcollegeTemple University. College of Liberal Arts
dc.temple.creatorMcDevitt, Jane K.
dc.temple.creatorLangford, Dianne
refterms.dateFOA2023-12-21T19:36:58Z


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