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dc.contributor.advisorDavis, James Earl, 1960-
dc.creatorMcPherson, Paris
dc.date.accessioned2023-09-03T14:57:13Z
dc.date.available2023-09-03T14:57:13Z
dc.date.issued2023-08
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12613/8942
dc.description.abstractLiterature indicates that while attending a predominantly White institution (PWI), Black men often experience stigmatization and feelings of alienation. Despite concerns of racial tension experienced by Black men at PWIs there is limited research exploring the campus climate perceptions of Black men in college. While Black students may have some similarities in navigating predominantly White campuses, there are relevant differences influenced by the intersection of race and gender. The post-secondary success of Black men has been identified as an area of concern in higher education due to the considerable disparities seen in college persistence and completion rates. However, discourse often focuses on perceived deficits of Black men in college instead of understanding how institutions can better support their success. There is a need to shift the conversation to explore how institutional climate plays a role in the experiences and outcomes of Black men. Research suggests that developing a sense of belonging is influenced by context and environment and can be challenging, but impactful for Black men. The current study seeks to understand the role that perceived campus climate plays in the development of sense of belonging for Black undergraduate men attending a PWI. The guiding research questions were: (1) What are the perceptions of campus climate for undergraduate Black men who attend a predominantly White institution? (2) How does the intersection of racial and gender identity influence the campus climate perceptions of undergraduate Black men? (3) How do the perceptions of campus climate influence the sense of belonging for undergraduate Black men? This qualitative study used various data collection methods including interviews, photovoice, and focus groups to gain an in-depth understanding of participants perceptions and experiences. Using an interpretative phenomenological approach, this analysis offers insights and makes meaning of 12 Black men’s lived experiences and perceptions of their campus belonging while attending a PWI. Eight themes emerged in response to the study research questions. The findings suggest that the campus climate perceptions of Black men are related to the intersection of their race and gender. Additionally, there were salient factors of campus climate that influenced the sense of belonging for participants in the study such as the absence/presence of Black peers and faculty/staff and supportive spaces of cultural familiarity. The findings of this study could have great implications for the future success of Black men as higher education institutions are confronted with declining enrollment and continued disparities in college persistence and graduation rates for their Black male students.
dc.format.extent183 pages
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherTemple University. Libraries
dc.relation.ispartofTheses and Dissertations
dc.rightsIN COPYRIGHT- This Rights Statement can be used for an Item that is in copyright. Using this statement implies that the organization making this Item available has determined that the Item is in copyright and either is the rights-holder, has obtained permission from the rights-holder(s) to make their Work(s) available, or makes the Item available under an exception or limitation to copyright (including Fair Use) that entitles it to make the Item available.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectHigher education
dc.subjectEducational administration
dc.subjectAfrican American studies
dc.subjectBlack men
dc.subjectCampus climate
dc.subjectPredominantly White institution
dc.subjectSense of belonging
dc.titleIS THIS WHERE WE BELONG? EXPLORING THE CAMPUS CLIMATE PERCEPTIONS OF BLACK MEN AT A PREDOMINANTLY WHITE INSTITUTION
dc.typeText
dc.type.genreThesis/Dissertation
dc.contributor.committeememberJohnson, Jennifer M., 1970-
dc.contributor.committeememberBrooks, Wanda M., 1969-
dc.contributor.committeememberWelbeck, Timothy N., Esq.
dc.description.departmentEducational Administration
dc.relation.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.34944/dspace/8906
dc.ada.noteFor Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accommodation, including help with reading this content, please contact scholarshare@temple.edu
dc.description.degreeEd.D.
dc.identifier.proqst15427
dc.date.updated2023-08-24T16:10:35Z
refterms.dateFOA2023-09-03T14:57:14Z
dc.identifier.filenameMcPherson_temple_0225E_15427.pdf


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