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dc.contributor.advisorAlloy, Lauren B.
dc.creatorKautz, Marin
dc.date.accessioned2023-09-03T14:54:43Z
dc.date.available2023-09-03T14:54:43Z
dc.date.issued2023-08
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12613/8931
dc.description.abstractSuicide is the second leading cause of death worldwide for adolescents and emerging adults. Despite knowledge of distal risk factors for suicide (i.e., childhood maltreatment), there is a dearth of developmentally informed psychobiological theories of suicide that test potentially modifiable proximal risk factors. Utilizing a multi-method design, this study integrates cognitive and biological risk factors into a model of suicide risk following maltreatment. Undergraduates completed a screener assessing medical history, trait reward and threat sensitivities, history of suicidal thoughts and behaviors (STBs), and childhood maltreatment. Participants without a history of autoimmune disease completed a reward and threat-salient acute stress task with pre- and post-task blood draws to measure peripheral inflammatory biomarkers. Utilizing ecological momentary assessment, a subset of participants with a history of suicidal ideation completed daily measures (three per day) of STBs and state reward and threat sensitivities for two-weeks before completing follow-up measures of STBs. Mediation models found that inflammatory reactivity to acute stress did not explain the relationship between maltreatment and ideation across the two-week follow-up, but those participants with greater TNF-α reactivity to an acute stress task reported more severe ideation at the study visit. Moderated mediation models showed that the association between inflammatory reactivity and suicidality was not significantly amplified by reward or threat sensitivity. But, at trait and state levels, those with histories of maltreatment who were less sensitive to rewards and more aware of potential threats experienced the most severe ideation. This investigation aimed to understand the processes that immediately precede STBs to inform future prevention and intervention efforts.
dc.format.extent165 pages
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherTemple University. Libraries
dc.relation.ispartofTheses and Dissertations
dc.rightsIN COPYRIGHT- This Rights Statement can be used for an Item that is in copyright. Using this statement implies that the organization making this Item available has determined that the Item is in copyright and either is the rights-holder, has obtained permission from the rights-holder(s) to make their Work(s) available, or makes the Item available under an exception or limitation to copyright (including Fair Use) that entitles it to make the Item available.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectClinical psychology
dc.subjectChild maltreatment
dc.subjectInflammation
dc.subjectProximal risk factors
dc.subjectSuicidal ideation
dc.titleSuicidal Thoughts and Behaviors in Late Adolescents Following Childhood Maltreatment Mediated by Enhanced Acute Stress-Responsivity
dc.typeText
dc.type.genreThesis/Dissertation
dc.contributor.committeememberEllman, Lauren M.
dc.contributor.committeememberOlino, Thomas
dc.contributor.committeememberDrabick, Deborah A.
dc.contributor.committeememberKlugman, Joshua
dc.contributor.committeememberLiu, Richard T.
dc.description.departmentPsychology
dc.relation.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.34944/dspace/8895
dc.ada.noteFor Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accommodation, including help with reading this content, please contact scholarshare@temple.edu
dc.description.degreePh.D.
dc.identifier.proqst15371
dc.creator.orcid0000-0001-5278-1222
dc.date.updated2023-08-24T16:09:31Z
refterms.dateFOA2023-09-03T14:54:44Z
dc.identifier.filenameKautz_temple_0225E_15371.pdf


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