Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorWattal, Sunil
dc.contributor.advisorGhose, Anindya
dc.creatorBurtch, David Gordon
dc.date.accessioned2020-10-21T14:26:54Z
dc.date.available2020-10-21T14:26:54Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.other870266826
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12613/887
dc.description.abstractCrowdfunded marketplaces have recently emerged as a novel avenue for entrepreneurs to raise capital in support of innovative ideas and ventures. In these markets, any individual can propose a project, and interested others can contribute their funds to support it. The economic potential of these markets has recently become apparent and, as a result they have begun gaining significant attention from legislators and regulators, who see crowdfunding as a possible solution to the economic woes currently facing the country. However, the behavior of participants in these marketplaces, a key factor that must be accounted for in any effort to formulate policy or regulation, or to identify appropriate design practices, remains poorly understood, primarily due to the many novelties of crowdfunding. Bearing in mind the need to ensure crowdfunding's sustainability as an industry, the formulation of policy and regulation, as well as best practices for participants, I report on three empirical studies that seek to identify and quantify a variety of important aspects of, and influences upon, participant behavior in crowdfunded markets. These three studies, presented as separate essays herein, i) explore the influence upon subsequent contributors from social information about prior others' actions, ii) examine the frictions that arise due to cultural differences between and amongst users, and iii) assess crowdfunders' use of information-hiding mechanisms, and the subsequent impact on later contributors in the market. In regard to each, I discuss the relevant theory, the methodology, data sources, results and implications. I conclude by highlighting the contributions of my work, and possible avenues for future research.
dc.format.extent144 pages
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherTemple University. Libraries
dc.relation.ispartofTheses and Dissertations
dc.rightsIN COPYRIGHT- This Rights Statement can be used for an Item that is in copyright. Using this statement implies that the organization making this Item available has determined that the Item is in copyright and either is the rights-holder, has obtained permission from the rights-holder(s) to make their Work(s) available, or makes the Item available under an exception or limitation to copyright (including Fair Use) that entitles it to make the Item available.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectInformation Technology
dc.subjectMarketing
dc.subjectEconomics
dc.subjectCrowdfunding
dc.subjectEntrepreneurial Finance
dc.subjectMicrofinance
dc.subjectVenture Capital
dc.titleAn Empirical Examination of Factors Influencing Participant Behavior in Crowdfunded Markets
dc.typeText
dc.type.genreThesis/Dissertation
dc.contributor.committeememberChen, Pei-yu
dc.contributor.committeememberPavlou, Paul A.
dc.contributor.committeememberRytchkov, Oleg
dc.contributor.committeememberMudambi, Susan
dc.description.departmentBusiness Administration/Management Information Systems
dc.relation.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.34944/dspace/869
dc.ada.noteFor Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accommodation, including help with reading this content, please contact scholarshare@temple.edu
dc.description.degreePh.D.
refterms.dateFOA2020-10-21T14:26:54Z


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
Burtch_temple_0225E_11389.pdf
Size:
6.748Mb
Format:
PDF

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record