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dc.contributor.advisorOlson, Ingrid R.
dc.creatorPopal, Haroon
dc.date.accessioned2023-09-03T14:37:17Z
dc.date.available2023-09-03T14:37:17Z
dc.date.issued2023-08
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12613/8874
dc.description.abstractAlthough the cerebellum has been traditionally thought of as a motor processing brain region, recent evidence suggests that the cerebellum is functionally diverse. The posterior cerebellum in particular has been shown to play a role in social cognitive processes, and recent work has proposed that this region helps fine tune mental models of social cognition to, for example, to ensure accurate selection of actions in a social scenario. Social interactions with strangers are difficult, in part because we are constantly trying to gauge whether the other person likes or dislikes us without much information for our mental models to help us. From a reward processing standpoint, this requires tracking the value (positive or negative) of people’s valence to us and ensuring that our predictions about people’s affect towards us are correct. The aim of this project was to specify how the posterior cerebellum uniquely contributes to social reward processing, and to distinguish this contribution from regions that are canonically part of the reward and social brain regions. Participants, ages 12-36, completed a well-matched social and monetary reward task in the scanner. In the monetary condition, participants were asked to select which of two doors would result in winning money, and in other trials losing money. In the social condition, participants were asked to select which of two faces representing people would like or dislike them. Representational similarity analysis was used to compare the responses of reward and social brain regions to conditions in which participants either won or lost money and were either liked or disliked by others. We found that portions of the posterior cerebellum were sensitive to social reward, and treated positive social rewards more similarly to negative social rewards than the striatum. These results suggest that these regions in the posterior cerebellum has a dissociable contribution to social reward processing compared to other brain regions.
dc.format.extent62 pages
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherTemple University. Libraries
dc.relation.ispartofTheses and Dissertations
dc.rightsIN COPYRIGHT- This Rights Statement can be used for an Item that is in copyright. Using this statement implies that the organization making this Item available has determined that the Item is in copyright and either is the rights-holder, has obtained permission from the rights-holder(s) to make their Work(s) available, or makes the Item available under an exception or limitation to copyright (including Fair Use) that entitles it to make the Item available.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectCognitive psychology
dc.subjectNeurosciences
dc.subjectSocial psychology
dc.subjectCerebellum
dc.subjectfMRI
dc.subjectReward
dc.subjectSocial
dc.subjectStriatum
dc.titlePinpointing the cerebellum's contribution to social reward processing
dc.typeText
dc.type.genreThesis/Dissertation
dc.contributor.committeememberSmith, David V.
dc.contributor.committeememberChein, Jason
dc.contributor.committeememberJarcho, Johanna
dc.contributor.committeememberWang, Yin
dc.contributor.committeememberJack, Allison E.
dc.description.departmentPsychology
dc.relation.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.34944/dspace/8838
dc.ada.noteFor Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accommodation, including help with reading this content, please contact scholarshare@temple.edu
dc.description.degreePh.D.
dc.identifier.proqst15389
dc.creator.orcid0000-0002-4508-5218
dc.date.updated2023-08-24T16:09:49Z
refterms.dateFOA2023-09-03T14:37:17Z
dc.identifier.filenamePopal_temple_0225E_15389.pdf


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