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dc.contributor.advisorAlloy, Lauren B.
dc.creatorBurke, Taylor Adele
dc.date.accessioned2020-10-21T14:26:53Z
dc.date.available2020-10-21T14:26:53Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12613/884
dc.description.abstractNonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI), the deliberate self-destruction of one’s own body tissue engaged in without associated suicidal intent, is a prevalent behavior among adolescents and young adults. The current study examined whether one aspect of cognitive control, inhibitory control in response to negative emotional stimuli, is associated with repetitive engagement in NSSI. It further sought to examine whether sleep deficiency/irregularity, stress, and reward sensitivity moderate this relationship. A multi-method approach (self-report, behavioral measures, actigraphy) was employed to sensitively probe these relationships among 114 late adolescents with and without a history of repetitive NSSI. Findings suggested no relationship between inhibitory control in response to negative emotional stimuli and NSSI, as measured by a behavioral measure, but a significant positive relationship as measured by self-report. Stress and sleep irregularity, but not sleep deficiency or reward sensitivity, were associated with NSSI group status. Interaction analyses suggested that sleep irregularity and stress moderated the relationship between inhibitory control in response to negative emotional stimuli and NSSI. Results are discussed in terms of conceptual and clinical implications. Findings highlight the necessity of examining the temporal dynamics between the study’s constructs and NSSI by employing an ecologically valid approach.
dc.format.extent58 pages
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherTemple University. Libraries
dc.relation.ispartofTheses and Dissertations
dc.rightsIN COPYRIGHT- This Rights Statement can be used for an Item that is in copyright. Using this statement implies that the organization making this Item available has determined that the Item is in copyright and either is the rights-holder, has obtained permission from the rights-holder(s) to make their Work(s) available, or makes the Item available under an exception or limitation to copyright (including Fair Use) that entitles it to make the Item available.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectPsychology
dc.subjectCognitive Control
dc.subjectNonsuicidal Self-injury
dc.subjectReward Sensitivity
dc.subjectSleep
dc.subjectStress
dc.titleExamining the relationship between cognitive control and nonsuicidal self-injury
dc.typeText
dc.type.genreThesis/Dissertation
dc.contributor.committeememberOlino, Thomas M.
dc.contributor.committeememberMcCloskey, Michael
dc.contributor.committeememberHeimberg, Richard G.
dc.contributor.committeememberKendall, Philip C.
dc.contributor.committeememberGiovannetti, Tania
dc.description.departmentPsychology
dc.relation.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.34944/dspace/866
dc.ada.noteFor Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accommodation, including help with reading this content, please contact scholarshare@temple.edu
dc.description.degreePh.D.
refterms.dateFOA2020-10-21T14:26:53Z


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