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dc.contributor.advisorHeimberg, Richard G.
dc.creatorBrozovich, Faith Auriel
dc.date.accessioned2020-10-21T14:26:51Z
dc.date.available2020-10-21T14:26:51Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.identifier.other864885106
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12613/870
dc.description.abstractSocial anxiety disorder (SAD) is characterized by an intense fear of negative evaluation from others in social and/or performance situations. Research has demonstrated that socially anxious individuals' post-event processing, or post-mortem review of social situations, often affects their levels of anxiety, negative emotions, interpretations, and memories of events (Brozovich & Heimberg, 2008). Furthermore, research has shown that processing negative descriptions using imagery is more emotion-evoking than semantic processing of the same material (Holmes & Mathews, 2005; Holmes & Mathews, 2010). The present study investigated post-event processing involving mental imagery and its effects on mood, anxiety, and potentially biased interpretations of social and nonsocial events. Socially anxious and non-anxious participants were told they would give a 5 min impromptu speech at the end of the experimental session. They were then randomly assigned to one of three manipulation conditions: post-event processing imagery (PEP-Imagery), post-event processing semantic (PEP-Semantic), or a Control condition. In the post-event processing conditions, participants recalled a past anxiety-provoking speech and thought about the anticipated speech either using imagery (PEP-Imagery) or focusing on their meaning (PEP-Semantic). Following the condition manipulation, participants completed a variety of affect, anxiety, and interpretation measures. Consistent with our predictions, socially anxious individuals in the PEP-Imagery condition displayed greater anxiety than individuals in the other conditions immediately following the induction and before the anticipated speech task. Socially anxious individuals in the PEP-Imagery condition also interpreted ambiguous scenarios in a more socially anxious manner than individuals in the Control condition. The impact of imagery during post-event processing in social anxiety and its implications for cognitive-behavioral interventions are discussed.
dc.format.extent98 pages
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherTemple University. Libraries
dc.relation.ispartofTheses and Dissertations
dc.rightsIN COPYRIGHT- This Rights Statement can be used for an Item that is in copyright. Using this statement implies that the organization making this Item available has determined that the Item is in copyright and either is the rights-holder, has obtained permission from the rights-holder(s) to make their Work(s) available, or makes the Item available under an exception or limitation to copyright (including Fair Use) that entitles it to make the Item available.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectPsychology, Clinical
dc.subjectImagery
dc.subjectPost-event Processing
dc.subjectSocial Anxiety
dc.titleExamining Mental Imagery and Post-event Processing among Socially Anxious Individuals
dc.typeText
dc.type.genreThesis/Dissertation
dc.contributor.committeememberAlloy, Lauren B.
dc.contributor.committeememberEllman, Lauren
dc.contributor.committeememberGiovannetti, Tania
dc.contributor.committeememberKendall, Philip C.
dc.contributor.committeememberMcCloskey, Michael
dc.description.departmentPsychology
dc.relation.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.34944/dspace/852
dc.ada.noteFor Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accommodation, including help with reading this content, please contact scholarshare@temple.edu
dc.description.degreePh.D.
refterms.dateFOA2020-10-21T14:26:51Z


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