Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorAnadolu-Okur, Nilgun, 1956-
dc.creatorViscuso, Christopher
dc.date.accessioned2023-05-22T20:06:30Z
dc.date.available2023-05-22T20:06:30Z
dc.date.issued2023
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12613/8556
dc.description.abstractThe objective of this dissertation is to converge and apply Elijah P. Anderson’s concept of “Nigger Moment,” as delineated in his 2011 work, The Cosmopolitan Canopy, as a particular category of trauma, experienced exclusively by Africana men, women, and children, with William E. Cross’ theory of racial socialization called “Nigrescence,” to Comparative Black Literature (CBL). While experiences with racism in both individual and structural forms have played a fundamental role in analyses of Africana literature, a focus on the incidence of these “Moments,” as they contribute to the subject’s “Nigrescence” (the series of racial encounters both within and without the group that precipitate the subject’s exploration of their racial identity) through an intersectional lens applied to CBL, allows the analyst or critic to observe how the means by which the “Moment” is experienced, in what context it is experienced, and how the identity of the literary subject(s) manifest patterns of Africana identity formation within fiction and non-fiction narrative, and, ultimately, Africana individuals. Ultimately, I will explore the pedagogical implications of applying the “N-Moment” to Comparative Black Literature within a multi-cultural and multi-racial classroom in the interest of social cohesion and positive identity formation. This will be done by outlining the various dimensions of the N-Moment within classed, gendered, and migrant contexts, as they apply to Claude McKay’s Banana Bottom, Jessie Redmon Fauset’s There is Confusion, Toni Morrison’s Bluest Eye, James Baldwin’s Another Country, Chimamanda Ngozie Adichie’s Americanah, and Edwidge Danticat’s Breath, Eyes, Memory.
dc.format.extent312 pages
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherTemple University. Libraries
dc.relation.ispartofTheses and Dissertations
dc.rightsIN COPYRIGHT- This Rights Statement can be used for an Item that is in copyright. Using this statement implies that the organization making this Item available has determined that the Item is in copyright and either is the rights-holder, has obtained permission from the rights-holder(s) to make their Work(s) available, or makes the Item available under an exception or limitation to copyright (including Fair Use) that entitles it to make the Item available.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectAfrican American studies
dc.subjectComparative literature
dc.subjectPedagogy
dc.subjectAfricana literature
dc.subjectBlack literature
dc.subjectComparative literature
dc.subjectLiterary theory
dc.subjectRacism
dc.subjectTrauma studies
dc.titleCOMPARATIVE BLACK LITERATURE AND RACIAL ENCOUNTERS: TRAUMA, IDENTITY, AND THE LITERARY REIFICIATION OF RACE
dc.typeText
dc.type.genreThesis/Dissertation
dc.contributor.committeememberAsante, Molefi Kete, 1942-
dc.contributor.committeememberStewart, James B. (James Benjamin), 1947-
dc.contributor.committeememberHenry, Katherine, 1956-
dc.description.departmentAfrican American Studies
dc.relation.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.34944/dspace/8520
dc.ada.noteFor Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accommodation, including help with reading this content, please contact scholarshare@temple.edu
dc.description.degreePh.D.
dc.identifier.proqst15237
dc.date.updated2023-05-19T15:12:52Z
refterms.dateFOA2023-05-22T20:06:30Z
dc.identifier.filenameViscuso_temple_0225E_15237.pdf


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
Viscuso_temple_0225E_15237.pdf
Size:
3.985Mb
Format:
PDF

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record