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dc.contributor.advisorThompson, Heather Ann, 1963-
dc.contributor.advisorFarber, David R.
dc.creatorBredell, Kyle Hampton
dc.date.accessioned2020-10-21T14:26:49Z
dc.date.available2020-10-21T14:26:49Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.other864885891
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12613/850
dc.description.abstractThe school district of Philadelphia built up its security program along a very distinct pathway that was largely unrelated to any real needs protection. This program played out in two distinct phases. In the late 1950s, black and white students clashed in the neighborhoods surrounding schools over integration. Black parents called upon the city to provide community policing to protect their children in the communities surrounding schools. As the 1960s progressed and the promised civil rights gains from city liberals failed to materialize, students turned increasingly to Black Nationalist and black power ideology. When this protest activity moved inside their schoolhouses as blacks simultaneously began moving into white neighborhoods, white Philadelphians began to feel threatened in their homes and schools. As black student activism became louder and more militant, white parents called upon the police to protect their children inside the school house, as opposed to the earlier calls for community policing by black parents. White parents, the PPD, and conservative city politicians pushed the district to adopt tougher disciplinary policies to ham string this activism, to which black parents vehemently objected. The district resisted demands to police the schools through the 1960s until finally caving to political pressure in the 1970s.
dc.format.extent101 pages
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherTemple University. Libraries
dc.relation.ispartofTheses and Dissertations
dc.rightsIN COPYRIGHT- This Rights Statement can be used for an Item that is in copyright. Using this statement implies that the organization making this Item available has determined that the Item is in copyright and either is the rights-holder, has obtained permission from the rights-holder(s) to make their Work(s) available, or makes the Item available under an exception or limitation to copyright (including Fair Use) that entitles it to make the Item available.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectHistory
dc.subjectEducation, History of
dc.subjectBlack History
dc.subjectCivil Rights
dc.subjectPhiladelphia
dc.subjectPolice
dc.subjectProtest
dc.subjectSchool
dc.subjectSecurity
dc.titleBlack Panther High: Racial Violence, Student Activism, and the Policing of Philadelphia Public Schools
dc.typeText
dc.type.genreThesis/Dissertation
dc.contributor.committeememberFarber, David R.
dc.description.departmentHistory
dc.relation.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.34944/dspace/832
dc.ada.noteFor Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accommodation, including help with reading this content, please contact scholarshare@temple.edu
dc.description.degreeM.F.A.
refterms.dateFOA2020-10-21T14:26:49Z


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