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dc.contributor.advisorFranko, Mark
dc.creatorCudjoe, Emmanuel
dc.date.accessioned2023-05-22T19:56:03Z
dc.date.available2023-05-22T19:56:03Z
dc.date.issued2023
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12613/8506
dc.description.abstractIndigenous dance music in Ghana serves peculiar roles in the lives of its practitioners from birth to death. This dissertation explores the role of the Kete dance of the Asante people as an Afrocentric agency of meaning-making. As a dance-music form, Kete is one of the most popular dances in Ghana and a major cultural attraction in the diaspora. Apart from ethnomusicological explorations of its music, not much has been done with regard to its movement element. I theorize Kete as a social construction that promotes and sustains culture through gestures. A performance of Kete at a particular context like a funeral can expose indigenous gender disparities, socio-cultural class structure, and embodied agencies for indigenous knowledge propagation. Through a qualitative research methodology including first-person methods of autoethnography and practical experiences, I examine my own experience and understanding of Kete as a practitioner since childhood and the experiences of selected participants in Ghana and the United States. The research also has an advocacy purpose through its affiliation with Afrocentricity. As a reflection of intelligent social structuring where dancers communicate through gestures, I explore the transition of Kete from the Manhyia palace in Kumasi (Traditional Category) to the Ghana Dance Ensemble (Academic and then Professional Category) in the University of Ghana from 1963 and explore the impact of neo-traditional structures on its proliferation today. Specifically, I explore the agency of the Kete dancer as centered within Kumasi and Accra, to ascertain to what extent this embodied knowledge can be explored through first-person methods to understand the structures of its proliferation and anticipated future developments.
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherTemple University. Libraries
dc.relation.ispartofTheses and Dissertations
dc.rightsIN COPYRIGHT- This Rights Statement can be used for an Item that is in copyright. Using this statement implies that the organization making this Item available has determined that the Item is in copyright and either is the rights-holder, has obtained permission from the rights-holder(s) to make their Work(s) available, or makes the Item available under an exception or limitation to copyright (including Fair Use) that entitles it to make the Item available.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectDance
dc.subjectAfrocentricity
dc.subjectAsante heritage
dc.subjectEmbodiment
dc.subjectGhana
dc.subjectKete dance
dc.subjectTransmission
dc.titleFROM PALACE TO ACADEMY: EMBODIMENT, TRANSMISSION AND DIS/CONTINUITIES IN THE ASANTE KETE DANCE AND MUSIC OF GHANA
dc.typeText
dc.type.genreThesis/Dissertation
dc.contributor.committeememberHunter, Whitney V.
dc.contributor.committeememberWilliams-Witherspoon, Kimmika
dc.contributor.committeememberAsante, Molefi Kete, 1942-
dc.contributor.committeememberKuwor, Sylvanus K.
dc.description.departmentDance
dc.relation.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.34944/dspace/8470
dc.ada.noteFor Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accommodation, including help with reading this content, please contact scholarshare@temple.edu
dc.description.degreePh.D.
dc.identifier.proqst15241
dc.date.updated2023-05-19T01:08:12Z
dc.embargo.lift05/18/2025
dc.identifier.filenameCudjoe_temple_0225E_15241.pdf


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