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dc.contributor.advisorBischke, Richard E.
dc.creatorKoseluk, Richard Anthony
dc.date.accessioned2023-05-18T20:29:49Z
dc.date.available2023-05-18T20:29:49Z
dc.date.issued1978
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12613/8438
dc.description.abstractNormal fault earthquakes and interseismic (secular) displacements are generated by a visco-elastic two­ dimensional finite element model. Model generated phases of crustal deformation are consistent with ob­served crustal deformation from repeated precise geodetic levels for the areas of Fairview Peak, Nevada and Hebgen Lake, Montana. The model fit to geodetic measurements is, in most cases, within the limits of random survey error. In this thesis I propose an elastic rebound theory for normal fault earthquakes. Model studies indicate that during the interseismic phase the ground is subject to relative doming in the vicinity of the fault which may have been interpreted by some investigators to result from magma intrusion. The rate at which doming occurs gives an indication of the asthenosphere effective viscosity, which was found to be on the order of 2.0 x 1021 poise for Fairview Peak and about 2.3 x 1021 poise for Hebgen Lake. Furthermore, interseismic model simulated extension rates are 1.36mm/yr, consistent with extension rates of greater than 0.4mm/yr observed within the Great Basin. The co­seismic phase results in the uplift of the footwall block and depression of the hanging wall block as has been reported by other investigators {Savage & Hastie, 1966). The sum of the interseismic and coseismic movements result in a tilt block type of topography, as is observed in the Basin and Range. Based on shear stress recovery the reoccurence interval for these faults is on the order of 10^3 years. Thus, the Fairview Peak and Hebgen Lake faults do not present any current earthquake hazard. However, since these faults do occur in regions where sets of normal faults are common, other faults may be approaching earthquake stress levels and consequently may present current earthquake hazards in these areas.
dc.format.extent82 pages
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherTemple University. Libraries
dc.relation.isformatofDigital copy of print original.
dc.relation.ispartofTheses and Dissertations
dc.rightsIN COPYRIGHT- This Rights Statement can be used for an Item that is in copyright. Using this statement implies that the organization making this Item available has determined that the Item is in copyright and either is the rights-holder, has obtained permission from the rights-holder(s) to make their Work(s) available, or makes the Item available under an exception or limitation to copyright (including Fair Use) that entitles it to make the Item available.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectGeology
dc.subjectEnvironmental science
dc.subjectGeoscience
dc.titleAn Elastic Rebound Model For Normal Fault Earthquakes
dc.typeImage
dc.type.genreThesis/Dissertation
dc.contributor.committeememberUlmer, Gene Carleton, 1937-2015
dc.contributor.committeememberGrandstaff, David E.
dc.description.departmentEarth and Environmental Science
dc.relation.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.34944/dspace/8402
dc.ada.noteFor Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accommodation, including help with reading this content, please contact scholarshare@temple.edu
dc.description.degreeM.A.
dc.description.degreegrantorTemple University
refterms.dateFOA2023-05-18T20:29:49Z


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