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dc.contributor.advisorJoyce, Joyce Ann, 1949-
dc.creatorOyebade, Olufemi
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-15T19:01:23Z
dc.date.available2022-08-15T19:01:23Z
dc.date.issued2022
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12613/8019
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation seeks to contribute to recent scholarship by demonstrating that an African-American utopian tradition persists in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, particularly in the works of African-American women writers. If liberation remains a fundamental theme in African-American literature – a definitive stance espoused by W. E. B. Du Bois and a host of other prominent African-American scholars, but also upheld by this dissertation – then such a consistently recurring goal has only been marginally completed, at best, in the United States. Despite proclamations of a universally attainable American Dream, African Americans remain disenfranchised by prison, education, and court systems as well as other integral institutions found within the United States.With this dilemma in mind and given the potentially subversive power of literature, this dissertation argues that the African-American utopian tradition in particular functions as a useful critical lens through which one can examine the often-elusive goal of revolutionary change. This lens raises the pertinent questions that one must answer in order to strive towards one’s utopia, and also exposes the systemic and thus conventional parameters latent in the too-familiar antithetical dystopias about which so many African-American narratives admonish their audiences to confront or, if they are lucky enough, avoid altogether. By focusing on a thematic continuum represented by the utopian small towns found in Zora Neale Hurston’s Their Eyes Were Watching God (1937), Gloria Naylor’s Mama Day (1988), Octavia Butler’s Parable of the Sower (1993) and Parable of the Talents (1998), and Toni Morrison’s Paradise (1997), this dissertation encapsulates a utopian tradition that inscribes race, gender, and sexuality, onto the African-American literary tradition.
dc.format.extent106 pages
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherTemple University. Libraries
dc.relation.ispartofTheses and Dissertations
dc.rightsIN COPYRIGHT- This Rights Statement can be used for an Item that is in copyright. Using this statement implies that the organization making this Item available has determined that the Item is in copyright and either is the rights-holder, has obtained permission from the rights-holder(s) to make their Work(s) available, or makes the Item available under an exception or limitation to copyright (including Fair Use) that entitles it to make the Item available.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectAfrican American studies
dc.subjectBlack studies
dc.subjectAmerican literature
dc.subjectNaylor, Gloria
dc.subjectMetanarratives
dc.subjectButler, Octavia
dc.subjectMorrison, Toni
dc.subjectUtopian literature
dc.subjectHurston, Zora Neale
dc.titleAfrican-American Utopian Literature: A Tradition Largely Lost and Forgotten, yet Pertinent in the Pursuit of Revolutionary Change
dc.typeText
dc.type.genreThesis/Dissertation
dc.contributor.committeememberWilliams, Roland Leander
dc.contributor.committeememberHenry, Katherine, 1956-
dc.contributor.committeememberRutledge, Gregory E.
dc.description.departmentEnglish
dc.relation.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.34944/dspace/7991
dc.ada.noteFor Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accommodation, including help with reading this content, please contact scholarshare@temple.edu
dc.description.degreePh.D.
dc.identifier.proqst15027
dc.date.updated2022-08-11T22:11:02Z
dc.embargo.lift08/11/2024
dc.identifier.filenameOyebade_temple_0225E_15027.pdf


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