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dc.contributor.advisorVenuti, Lawrence
dc.creatorHarrington, Matthew Coddington
dc.date.accessioned2022-05-26T18:26:07Z
dc.date.available2022-05-26T18:26:07Z
dc.date.issued2022
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12613/7785
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation studies the role of translation in the emergence of political concepts as they traveled through the Atlantic world in various discourses, documents, and genres of writing. A practice vital to new revolutionary governments, exiled or internal dissidents, and international abolitionists alike, the translation of political writing supported movements and expanded their scope by, I argue, not merely circulating, but actively transforming the meaning of such concepts as “liberty,” “equality,” “emancipation,” “public feeling,” “the people,” and “abolition.” Our study of this phenomenon has been limited—even stifled altogether—by the still prevailing tendency, academically and colloquially, to misconstrue translation as transparent communication, as the transfer of meaning unchanged from one language to another. Against this tendency, my study proceeds from the understanding that translation is an interpretive act that necessarily varies the meaning, form, and effects of whatever materials are translated. I examine cases of translation that generatively intervened in two decisive moments for the transnational production of the ideas that would become foundational for so-called Western modernity: the Age of Revolutions and the abolitionist period. I offer close readings of the translation of state papers, political theory, and literature by African American educator Prince Saunders, Venezuelan diplomat Manuel García de Sena, Irish abolitionist R.R. Madden, and French writer Louise Swanton Belloc. They demonstrate how key insurgent ideas were forged through cultural exchange in more textured, dynamic historical complexity than we have yet grasped. As the project traces the resignification of political concepts that circulated the ports of the slaveholding Atlantic, into and out of French, Spanish, and English, it seeks to push the disciplinary boundaries of comparative Americanist or Atlanticist frameworks to treat translations as objects of study in their own right, worthy of sustained and systematic analysis.
dc.format.extent320 pages
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherTemple University. Libraries
dc.relation.ispartofTheses and Dissertations
dc.rightsIN COPYRIGHT- This Rights Statement can be used for an Item that is in copyright. Using this statement implies that the organization making this Item available has determined that the Item is in copyright and either is the rights-holder, has obtained permission from the rights-holder(s) to make their Work(s) available, or makes the Item available under an exception or limitation to copyright (including Fair Use) that entitles it to make the Item available.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectAmerican studies
dc.subjectTranslation studies
dc.subjectAboltionism
dc.subjectAtlantic world
dc.subjectLiterary history
dc.subjectPolitics
dc.subjectRevolution
dc.titleTranslating Revolutionary Politics in the Atlantic World, 1776-1853
dc.typeText
dc.type.genreThesis/Dissertation
dc.contributor.committeememberSalazar, James B.
dc.contributor.committeememberHenry, Katherine, 1956-
dc.contributor.committeememberBrickhouse, Anna
dc.description.departmentEnglish
dc.relation.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.34944/dspace/7757
dc.ada.noteFor Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accommodation, including help with reading this content, please contact scholarshare@temple.edu
dc.description.degreePh.D.
dc.identifier.proqst14905
dc.date.updated2022-05-11T16:12:20Z
dc.embargo.lift05/11/2024
dc.identifier.filenameHarrington_temple_0225E_14905.pdf


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