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dc.contributor.advisorAlloy, Lauren B.
dc.creatorBender, Rachel
dc.date.accessioned2020-10-20T13:33:32Z
dc.date.available2020-10-20T13:33:32Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.identifier.other864885592
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12613/772
dc.description.abstractMost life stress literature in bipolar disorder (BD) fails to account for the possibility of a changing relationship between psychosocial context and episode initiation across the course of the disorder. The kindling hypothesis states that over the longitudinal course of recurrent affective disorders, there is a weakening temporal relationship between major life stress and episode initiation (Post, 1992). This process could reflect either a progressive sensitization or a progressive autonomy (i.e., insensitivity) to life stress. The present study aimed to test the kindling model in BD by examining the effect of lifetime mood episodes on the relationship between proximal life events and prospectively assessed mood episodes. Polarity-specific tests of the model were conducted across the continuum of event severity, with respect to both impact and frequency of life events. Moreover, examination of the kindling hypothesis was embedded in the context of two emerging biopsychosocial theories of BD: the expanded Behavioral Approach System Dysregulation Model and the Circadian and Social Rhythm Theory. Data from 278 participants (146 bipolar spectrum participants and 132 normal control participants) were collected as part of the Temple-Wisconsin Longitudinal Investigation of Bipolar Spectrum Project. Hypotheses were polarity- and event-type specific and were in line with a stress sensitization model of bipolar spectrum disorders (BSD), rather than a stress autonomy model. Results partially supported a sensitization model: there was a decreased frequency and an increased impact of major events, and an increased frequency and impact of minor events. However, results for specific polarities and event types were not fully consistent with a stress sensitization model. Implications of these findings are addressed, followed by a discussion of study strengths, limitations, and promising directions for future research.
dc.format.extent118 pages
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherTemple University. Libraries
dc.relation.ispartofTheses and Dissertations
dc.rightsIN COPYRIGHT- This Rights Statement can be used for an Item that is in copyright. Using this statement implies that the organization making this Item available has determined that the Item is in copyright and either is the rights-holder, has obtained permission from the rights-holder(s) to make their Work(s) available, or makes the Item available under an exception or limitation to copyright (including Fair Use) that entitles it to make the Item available.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectPsychology, Clinical
dc.subjectBipolar Disorder
dc.subjectCourse
dc.subjectKindling
dc.subjectSensitization
dc.subjectStress
dc.titleKindling of Life Stress in Bipolar Disorder: Comparison of Sensitization and Autonomy Models and Integration with Emerging Biopsychosocial Theories
dc.typeText
dc.type.genreThesis/Dissertation
dc.contributor.committeememberHeimberg, Richard G.
dc.contributor.committeememberMcCloskey, Michael
dc.contributor.committeememberKendall, Philip C.
dc.contributor.committeememberGiovannetti, Tania
dc.contributor.committeememberWeinraub, Marsha
dc.description.departmentPsychology
dc.relation.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.34944/dspace/754
dc.ada.noteFor Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accommodation, including help with reading this content, please contact scholarshare@temple.edu
dc.description.degreePh.D.
refterms.dateFOA2020-10-20T13:33:32Z


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