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dc.contributor.advisorDavis, James Earl, 1960-
dc.creatorChappelle, Courtney
dc.date.accessioned2022-05-26T18:07:00Z
dc.date.available2022-05-26T18:07:00Z
dc.date.issued2022
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12613/7666
dc.description.abstractThis qualitative research study explores the challenges encountered by five African American women who serve as high-ranking higher education administrators at Predominantly White Institutions (PWIs) in Pennsylvania as well as how they contend with these challenges. This study also uses an Intersectionality lens to explore the intersectionality of race and gender and how participants feel this intersectionality, as well as gender and racial stereotypes, has impacted their professional lives and how they are perceived/received by colleagues. As we strive to ascend to a level of increased diversity in higher education professionals that is reflective of our increasingly diverse society and student population, it is essential that we explore what is often uncomfortable territory to create more enlightened, supportive, and inclusive work environments. Purposive sampling and phenomenological research methods including semi-structured interviews using open-ended questions were utilized to delve into the experiences of the participants. Participants were asked about professional challenges, work-life balance, and how they experience working at PWIs among other topics. The emerging themes were professional challenges, coping mechanisms/support, mentorship, navigating higher education as Black women, and respect or lack thereof from colleagues and subordinates. The ladies were also asked about their views on the future of Black women in higher education and for any advice for Black women currently working as administrators and those who aspire to do so. Though they encounter many challenges, some unique to them as Black women, all the participants recognize the value of their work and plan to continue that work for their students as well as future Black female administrators following in their footsteps.
dc.format.extent110 pages
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherTemple University. Libraries
dc.relation.ispartofTheses and Dissertations
dc.rightsIN COPYRIGHT- This Rights Statement can be used for an Item that is in copyright. Using this statement implies that the organization making this Item available has determined that the Item is in copyright and either is the rights-holder, has obtained permission from the rights-holder(s) to make their Work(s) available, or makes the Item available under an exception or limitation to copyright (including Fair Use) that entitles it to make the Item available.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectHigher education
dc.titleAfrican American Women in Higher Education Administrative Leadership: Exploring the Experiences and Challenges at Pennsylvania PWIs
dc.typeText
dc.type.genreThesis/Dissertation
dc.contributor.committeememberJohnson, Jennifer M., 1970-
dc.contributor.committeememberDuCette, Joseph P.
dc.contributor.committeememberBrooks, Wanda M., 1969-
dc.contributor.committeememberAustin, Crystal
dc.description.departmentEducational Administration
dc.relation.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.34944/dspace/7638
dc.ada.noteFor Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accommodation, including help with reading this content, please contact scholarshare@temple.edu
dc.description.degreeEd.D.
dc.identifier.proqst14749
dc.date.updated2022-05-11T16:08:08Z
refterms.dateFOA2022-05-26T18:07:01Z
dc.identifier.filenameChappelle_temple_0225E_14749.pdf


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