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dc.contributor.advisorConnell, James
dc.creatorBaucum McKinney, Jeri
dc.date.accessioned2020-10-20T13:33:30Z
dc.date.available2020-10-20T13:33:30Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.identifier.other864885659
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12613/758
dc.description.abstractThe research regarding the benefits and outcomes associated with parental involvement is expansive. However, there is a dearth of empirical research that critically examines interventions that increase parental involvement in schools where participation is limited. This study enhances the research on parental involvement by exploring the barriers that exist for minority families in high need public schools and examining the effect of school newsletters (grounded in Hoover-Dempsey and Sandler's (1995, 1997, 2005) theoretical model of the parental involvement process) on parents' perceptions regarding school outreach efforts. In addition, a subsidiary analysis examines teachers' perceptions regarding the presence of parental involvement at their school and the frequency in which teachers encouraged involvement from their parents. Data from an experimental and control group parent and teacher sample was collected. In addition, a repeated measures ANOVA was conducted to determine if parent perceptions and their motivation to become involved were influenced by the bi-weekly distribution of the school newsletter. Teacher perceptions were analyzed using a t-test, followed by a repeated measures ANOVA for significant interactions. Informal surveys were administered to parents and teachers at the end of the study to assess their reaction to the school newsletters. Results showed that parents and teachers favored school newsletters and found the newsletters readable, informative, and enjoyable. Further, school newsletters can be used as a practical tool to influence parent perceptions, as significant increases in parents' perceptions regarding the school's general outreach efforts were indicated. However, increases in parent perceptions were greater in the control school location without the newsletter as an intervention, but with an established system in place for communicating with parents. Similarly, significant increases in teachers' reports of parental involvement behaviors were found, but also in the control school. Using one practical and feasible method for transmitting information to parents and promoting outreach was identified as a method to increase parent involvement. Implications for schools attempting to examine interventions to increase parental involvement in urban school settings are discussed.
dc.format.extent131 pages
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherTemple University. Libraries
dc.relation.ispartofTheses and Dissertations
dc.rightsIN COPYRIGHT- This Rights Statement can be used for an Item that is in copyright. Using this statement implies that the organization making this Item available has determined that the Item is in copyright and either is the rights-holder, has obtained permission from the rights-holder(s) to make their Work(s) available, or makes the Item available under an exception or limitation to copyright (including Fair Use) that entitles it to make the Item available.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectPsychology
dc.subjectSchool Psychology
dc.titleThe Evaluation of the Effects of School Newsletters on Parent Perceptions in an Urban School System
dc.typeText
dc.type.genreThesis/Dissertation
dc.contributor.committeememberDuCette, Joseph P.
dc.contributor.committeememberRotheram-Fuller, Erin
dc.contributor.committeememberFiorello, Catherine A.
dc.contributor.committeememberFarley, Frank
dc.description.departmentSchool Psychology
dc.relation.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.34944/dspace/740
dc.ada.noteFor Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accommodation, including help with reading this content, please contact scholarshare@temple.edu
dc.description.degreePh.D.
refterms.dateFOA2020-10-20T13:33:30Z


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