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dc.creatorZisman-Ilani, Yaara
dc.creatorRoth, Robert M.
dc.creatorMistler, Lisa A.
dc.date.accessioned2022-04-08T15:20:24Z
dc.date.available2022-04-08T15:20:24Z
dc.date.issued2021-08-21
dc.identifier.citationZisman-Ilani, Y., Roth, R. M., & Mistler, L. A. (2021). Time to Support Extensive Implementation of Shared Decision Making in Psychiatry. JAMA Psychiatry, 78(11), 1183–1184. https://doi.org/10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2021.2247
dc.identifier.issn2168-6238
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.34944/dspace/7490
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12613/7512
dc.descriptionShared decision making (SDM) is a health communication approach focusing on patient-clinician interactions around treatment decisions, with the goals of improving clinical and functional outcomes and providing personalized care.1 The fundamental principles of SDM involve (1) eliminating power asymmetries between clinician and patient; (2) acknowledging that there are at least 2 expert participants: a patient having lived-experience expertise, a clinician having professional expertise, and sometimes a family member2; (3) eliciting patient preferences for their involvement in the decision-making (autonomously, conjointly with clinician input, letting clinician make decisions) and eliciting the patient’s specific values that could guide the decision (eg, reducing medication adverse effects); (4) discussing at least 2 treatment options (eg, taking, tapering, or stopping antipsychotic medications); (5) making a decision that aligns with the patient’s goals, preferences, and values that also makes clear the risks involved in particular decisions3; and (6) accepting that the patient’s choice of treatment plan may differ from the clinician’s recommendation. SDM has been endorsed as the gold standard of patient-clinician interaction in preference-based care by the National Academy of Medicine in the US and the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence in the UK. Studies in the last decade of individuals with serious mental illness (SMI) demonstrating the feasibility of using SDM, and showing the potential for improved outcomes, support the recent acknowledgment of SDM as an essential practice by the American Psychiatric Association4 and the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration.
dc.format.extent2 pages
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofFaculty/ Researcher Works
dc.relation.haspartJAMA Psychiatry, Vol. 78, No. 11
dc.relation.isreferencedbyAmerican Medical Association
dc.rightsAll Rights Reserved
dc.subjectHealth care delivery model
dc.subjectPsychiatry and behavioral health
dc.subjectClinical decision suppor
dc.subjectShared decision making and communication
dc.titleTime to Support Extensive Implementation of Shared Decision Making in Psychiatry
dc.typeText
dc.type.genreJournal article
dc.description.departmentSocial and Behavioral Sciences
dc.relation.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2021.2247
dc.ada.noteFor Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accommodation, including help with reading this content, please contact scholarshare@temple.edu
dc.description.schoolcollegeTemple University. College of Public Health
dc.creator.orcidZisman-Ilani|0000-0001-6852-2583
dc.temple.creatorZisman-Ilani, Yaara
refterms.dateFOA2022-04-08T15:20:24Z


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