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dc.contributor.advisorKeston, Geoff
dc.creatorNeske, Willow
dc.date.accessioned2022-04-04T17:38:24Z
dc.date.available2022-04-04T17:38:24Z
dc.date.issued2022
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12613/7503
dc.descriptionThis research project was completed as part of the Engineering 2196 Technical Communication course.
dc.description.abstractThis paper proposes bioretention design features for land developers in the Philadelphia area. For areas that experience intermittent storms that produce high volumes of runoff and high concentrations of metals and inorganic pollutants, the paper recommends constructing bioretention systems with dimensions following the Philadelphia Water Department’s bioretention sizing table. The basin media should consist of loam or sandy loam modified with a carbon-rich amendment, while the drainage layer media should consist of an amended gravel/woodchip mixture. Three exploratory, inexpensive amendments — waste tire crumb rubber, coconut coir fiber, and biochar — were evaluated to enhance the performance of the bioretention system; these carbon-based adsorbents have been proven to remove metals and inorganic nutrients from contaminated water. By pyrolyzing coconut coir fiber at around 300 deg C, biochar amendments to the soil and internal water storage layers could enhance a bioretention system’s capacity to adsorb metals while also improving microbial and plant mediated nutrient removal and water retention potential. The bioretention system is expected to meet the PWD’s requirements for metal and inorganic nutrient pollution removal even in excessive circumstances, thereby allowing the developer’s project to proceed as intended while protecting combined wastewater systems and the surrounding urban environment from excessive contaminated runoff.
dc.format.extent26 pages
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherTemple University. Libraries
dc.relation.ispartofLivingstone Undergraduate Research Awards
dc.relation.isreferencedbyLivingstone Undergraduate Research Awards website: https://sites.temple.edu/livingstone/2022-livingstone-undergraduate-research-award-in-stem/
dc.rightsIN COPYRIGHT- This Rights Statement can be used for an Item that is in copyright. Using this statement implies that the organization making this Item available has determined that the Item is in copyright and either is the rights-holder, has obtained permission from the rights-holder(s) to make their Work(s) available, or makes the Item available under an exception or limitation to copyright (including Fair Use) that entitles it to make the Item available.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectPhiladelphia (Pa.). Water Department
dc.subjectUrban runoff--Management
dc.subjectStorm water retention basins
dc.titleBioretention Systems Optimized for Denitrification: Stormwater Management Practice Design Recommendations for Philadelphia
dc.typeText
dc.type.genreResearch project
dc.description.departmentEngineering
dc.relation.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.34944/dspace/7481
dc.ada.noteFor Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accommodation, including help with reading this content, please contact scholarshare@temple.edu
dc.description.awardLivingstone Undergraduate Research Award in STEM Disciplines
dc.description.schoolcollegeTemple University. College of Engineering
dc.temple.creatorNeske, Willow
refterms.dateFOA2022-04-04T17:38:25Z


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