• A Review of Three Models For Enforcing Housing Codes

      Center for Public Health Law Research (Temple University Beasley School of Law) (2017-04-04)
    • A Scan of CDC-Authored Articles on Legal Epidemiology, 2011-2015

      Center for Public Health Law Research (Temple University Beasley School of Law) (2016-11-01)
      Objective: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) conducts research on legal epidemiology, the scientific study of law as a factor in the cause, distribution, and prevention of disease. This study describes a scan of articles written by CDC staff members to characterize the frequency and key features of legal epidemiology articles and their distribution across CDC departments and divisions. Methods: CDC librarians searched an internal repository for journal articles by CDC staff published from January 1, 2011, to May 31, 2015. Researchers reviewed and coded the abstracts to produce data on key features of the articles. Results: Researchers identified 158 CDC-authored legal epidemiology articles published in 83 journals, most frequently in Preventing Chronic Disease (14 publications), Journal of Public Health Management Practice (10 publications), and Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (9 publications). Most articles concerned the use and impact of law as a deliberate tool of intervention. Thirteen articles addressed the legal infrastructure of public health, and 3 assessed the incidental or unintended effects of nonhealth laws. CDC-authored articles encompassed policy making, implementation, and impact. Literature reviews and studies mapping laws across multiple jurisdictions constituted one-quarter of all publications. Studies addressed laws at the international, national, state, local, and organizational levels. Conclusion: Results of the scan can be used to identify opportunities for the agency to better support research, professional development, networking, publication, and tracking of publication in this emerging field.
    • Advancing Legal Epidemiology: An Introduction

      Center for Public Health Law Research (Temple University Beasley School of Law) (2020-02-10)
    • After June Medical Services: The Past, Present, And Future Of Regulating Reproduction

      Center for Public Health Law Research (Temple University Beasley School of Law); Harvard Law and Policy Review (Harvard University); Florida State University College of Law (2020-06-30)
      Where does abortion law in the United States stand, and where are we headed? In the wake of Supreme Court’s landmark decision, June Medical Services v. Russo, join the authors of four influential books on reproductive health, Professors David S. Cohen, Michele Goodwin, Carol Sanger, and Mary Ziegler, for a conversation moderated by NPR’s Sarah McCammon about the past, present, and future of the law and politics of reproduction. The authors’ insights also bring into focus recent state policies that have deepened inequalities and strained access to pregnancy and abortion care during the pandemic.
    • After The Inauguration: Abortion Law In 2021

      Center for Public Health Law Research (Temple University Beasley School of Law); Case Western Reserve Law-Medicine Center (Case Western Reserve University) (2021-01-28)
      What is in store for abortion rights with new national leadership and a differently-configured Supreme Court? The coming year may prove crucial to abortion law’s future. The Biden Administration may revisit any number of anti-abortion policies, from the unnecessary regulation of medication abortion to restrictions on funding for abortion providers. At the same time, the constitutional right to abortion hangs in the balance. A majority of the Supreme Court stands poised to overturn or further eviscerate the core holding of Roe v. Wade, raising the specter of discriminatory criminalization of abortion care. This conversation brings together experts to discuss what the map for abortion access looks like with and without federal protection for abortion rights. Specifically, panelists discuss how abortion access could change – across state lines and through “tele-abortion” or self-managed abortion – and what challenges remain during the pandemic. Speakers not only analyze the abortion cases that may land before the Supreme Court, but also consider the potential responses of state legislatures and the federal government.
    • Anti-Bullying Laws: A Blueprint for Prevention

      Center for Public Health Law Research (Temple University Beasley School of Law) (2015-10-07)
    • Assessing Legal Responses to COVID-19

      Burris, Scott; de Guia, Sarah; Gable, Lance; Levin, Donna E.; Parmet, Wendy E.; Terry, Nicolas P.; Center for Public Health Law Research (Temple University); ChangeLab Solutions; Wayne State University; The Network for Public Health Law; et al. (2020-08)
      In August 2020, as the nation continued to address the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, which had resulted in hundreds of thousands of deaths and a severe economic recession, 50 top national experts offered an assessment of the U.S. policy response to the crisis. The research details the widespread failure of the country’s leadership in planning and executing a cohesive, national response, and how the crisis exposed weaknesses in the nation’s health care and public health systems. In Assessing Legal Responses to COVID-19, the authors also offer recommendations on how federal, state and local leaders can better respond to COVID-19 and future pandemics.
    • Better Health Faster: The Five Essential Public Health Law Services

      Center for Public Health Law Research (Temple University Beasley School of Law) (2016-10-16)
    • Better Law and Policies to Reduce Gun Violence

      Center for Public Health Law Research (Temple University Beasley School of Law) (2013-10-17)
      In this Critical Opportunities presentation, Jeffrey Swanson, PhD, shares recommendations for the use of law to reduce the problem of gun violence. The recommendations are a package of policies that were originally presented at the Johns Hopkins Gun Policy Summit in January 2013. They include: fixing the background check system, modifying the list of gun-prohibited persons, fixing the mental health criteria for gun ownership, reforming dealer licensing and penalties for gun trafficking, requiring personalized guns, banning assault weapons, and increasing federal funding for gun violence research.
    • Building the Evidence: Creating a Framework for Assessing Costs and Impacts of Shared Use Agreements

      Center for Public Health Law Research (Temple University Beasley School of Law); Framework for Shared Use Workgroup; County of Los Angeles Public Health, Division of Chronic Disease & Injury Prevention; ChangeLab Solutions (2014-09-02)
      Communities across the country are seeking safe, accessible, and affordable places for children and their families to exercise and play. Los Angeles County is no different. Public schools have a variety of recreational facilities—gymnasiums, playgrounds, fields, courts, and tracks—where people can engage in physical activity. In some low-income communities, schools are often the only place to find safe and affordable recreation facilities. Unfortunately, these spaces are often locked and inaccessible to students and the community during non-school hours. Schools within Los Angeles County, however, are successfully embracing shared use1 as a strategy to create more opportunities for physical activity to improve the health outcomes of students and community members alike.he team analyzed 20 different documents broadly defined as “joint use agreements.” The findings are displayed in this report, which provides a snapshot of the relative strengths and weaknesses of all 20 agreements through analysis and case studies from neighborhoods in the Los Angeles area.
    • Corn Masa Flour Fortification for the Prevention of Neural Tube Defects

      Center for Public Health Law Research (Temple University Beasley School of Law) (2013-10-17)
      Neural tube defects, such as spina bifida or anencephaly, affect 3,000 babies in the United States each year. The majority of these cases can be prevented by taking folic acid throughout pregnancy, through diet or other supplements, or through the fortification of food. Because many grains in the United States are enriched with folic acid, there have been declines in neural tube defects. However, many staple foods in Hispanic communities are made from corn flour, which is not fortified. Hispanic populations also see greater rates of neural tube defects. In their Critical Opportunities presentation, Erica Reott, MPH and Lt. Cmdr. Kinzie Lee, MPH, make the case that fortifying corn flour could improve health outcomes and reduce disparities among Hispanic women and their babies.
    • COVID-19 Law and Policy Briefings, Series One: Abortion Exceptionalism

      George Consortium; Center for Health Policy and Law (Northeastern University School of Law); Center for Public Health Law Research (Temple University Beasley School of Law); APHA Law Section (2020-04-23)
      Over the past few weeks, nine states have tried to implement—with varying degrees of success—measures suspending abortions in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. Our panel of reproductive rights experts discusses recent court opinions, future Supreme Court intervention, and possible lasting impacts on reproductive health law in the United States.
    • COVID-19 Law and Policy Briefings, Series One: Commandeering Private Property for Pandemic Response

      George Consortium; Center for Health Policy and Law (Northeastern University School of Law); Center for Public Health Law Research (Temple University Beasley School of Law); APHA Law Section (2020-03-31)
      As the number of cases grows in this pandemic, one specific medical resource in short supply is bed space. One solution to this issue is for governments to commandeer private property, such as hotels, convention centers, university dormitories, or even defunct hospitals. The legal question here is one of authority.
    • COVID-19 Law and Policy Briefings, Series One: Domestic Violence

      George Consortium; Center for Health Policy and Law (Northeastern University School of Law); Center for Public Health Law Research (Temple University Beasley School of Law); APHA Law Section (2020-06-09)
      In the past month, new evidence has emerged that global rates of domestic violence were rising as a result of the pandemic. This Briefing will explore the ways the pandemic response exacerbated conditions for intimate partner abuse, and will describe how we may better prepare in anticipation of future waves of the coronavirus, and other possible pandemics.
    • COVID-19 Law and Policy Briefings, Series One: Drug Development, the Role of the FDA, and Emergency Use

      George Consortium; Center for Health Policy and Law (Northeastern University School of Law); Center for Public Health Law Research (Temple University Beasley School of Law); APHA Law Section (2020-04-15)
      This Briefing seeks to demystify drug development — offering a crash in the development process and clinical trials, the role the FDA plays in reviewing and approving drugs, and the differences between off-label and compassionate use.
    • COVID-19 Law and Policy Briefings, Series One: Election Concerns

      George Consortium; Center for Health Policy and Law (Northeastern University School of Law); Center for Public Health Law Research (Temple University Beasley School of Law); APHA Law Section (2020-05-12)
      There are 19 state primary elections between May 12 and June 9, when many states have stay-at-home orders in place until at least June 4. Amid an ongoing pandemic, election security and safety for voters remain in question. Our guests reflect on concerns raised by the recent primary in Wisconsin, and project ahead with lessons learned for the forthcoming primaries.
    • COVID-19 Law and Policy Briefings, Series One: Equitable Enforcement

      George Consortium; Center for Health Policy and Law (Northeastern University School of Law); Center for Public Health Law Research (Temple University Beasley School of Law); APHA Law Section (2020-06-02)
      As COVID-19 inflicts disproportionate harm on communities of color, inequitable enforcement of public health policies in response to the pandemic further widens health disparities. Police are strictly enforcing stay-at-home orders in some communities of color, while employing more lenient approaches in predominantly white communities. At the same time, enforcement of some laws designed to protect health and safety—from local housing codes to federal environmental laws like the Clean Air Act—has been suspended during the emergency response. This Briefing will discuss inequitable enforcement of public health laws and options that government officials should consider in order to promote more equitable outcomes during the pandemic and in the long-term, after the public health crisis subsides.
    • COVID-19 Law and Policy Briefings, Series One: Evictions in the Age of COVID-19

      George Consortium; Center for Health Policy and Law (Northeastern University School of Law); Center for Public Health Law Research (Temple University Beasley School of Law); APHA Law Section (2020-04-21)
      As the coronavirus continues to take its toll on unemployment in the United States, one of the biggest questions for Americans is how they will afford to pay rent. To protect renters, a growing number of cities and states are have temporarily halted evictions. During this Briefing, our guests describe the government authority to act and prevent evictions, and consider the sustainability of these orders and implications for the economy and public health going forward.
    • COVID-19 Law and Policy Briefings, Series One: Human Subject Research

      George Consortium; Center for Health Policy and Law (Northeastern University School of Law); Center for Public Health Law Research (Temple University Beasley School of Law); APHA Law Section (2020-05-06)
      Amid social distancing and other on-the-ground mitigation measures, arises the necessity of a vaccine and other therapeutic treatments for long-term treatment or eradication of COVID-19. With drug development comes questions of safety and efficacy, and inevitable concerns around human subject research. This Briefing explores the legal issues around how to balance speed to market, obligations to science, and an ethical development process.
    • COVID-19 Law and Policy Briefings, Series One: Immigration

      George Consortium; Center for Health Policy and Law (Northeastern University School of Law); Center for Public Health Law Research (Temple University Beasley School of Law); APHA Law Section (2020-04-28)
      On April 22, President Trump issued an executive order to limit immigration and pause the issuance of Green Cards to prevent the continued spread of COVID-19. In this Briefing, our guests discuss whether limitations on immigration may be a sound mitigation tactic, or whether restrictive immigration policies may be impeding our response to the pandemic.