• Critical Congenital Heart Defects and Pulse Oximetry

      Center for Public Health Law Research (Temple University Beasley School of Law) (2014-03-25)
      Congenital heart defects cause nearly one-quarter of deaths due to birth defects in infants. Nearly 5,000 babies are born each year with seven specific Critical Congenital Heart Defects or Critical Congenital Heart Disease (CCHD). There is a low-cost, non-invasive screening procedure, called pulse oximetry, that is effective in detecting CCHD. By making this screening mandatory, CCHD could be detected early and follow-ups could be done to improve health. Chris Walker, of the Network for Public Health Law, shared this Critical Opportunity at the 2012 Public Health Law Conference in Atlanta.
    • Exploring Policy Surveillance: Global Policy Surveillance: Challenges and Opportunities

      Center for Public Health Law Research (Temple University Beasley School of Law); Policy Surveillance Program (Temple University Beasley School of Law) (2019-02-11)
      The second webinar in this series explores the challenges and opportunities for global policy surveillance, framing it within the current state of global comparative law and policy research, and describing emerging use examples, and standards and practices to support the growing field.
    • Exploring Policy Surveillance: Local Policy Surveillance: Challenges and Opportunities

      Center for Public Health Law Research (Temple University Beasley School of Law); Policy Surveillance Program (Temple University Beasley School of Law) (2019-03-12)
      This webinar explores the challenges and opportunities in local policy surveillance. It shares use cases, like CityHealth.org and others, and identifies and examines the practical and methodological barriers facing local practitioners using policy surveillance.
    • Exploring Policy Surveillance: Policy Surveillance for Policymaking

      Center for Public Health Law Research (Temple University Beasley School of Law); Policy Surveillance Program (Temple University Beasley School of Law) (2019-05-14)
      This final webinar in the series examines the use of policy surveillance and other scientific legal mapping methods and data used in practice. Attendees hear applications of policy surveillance in practice, and how policy surveillance may have made a difference in making, implementing and evaluating policy and policy impact on health.
    • Exploring Policy Surveillance: Policy Surveillance for Research

      Center for Public Health Law Research (Temple University Beasley School of Law); Policy Surveillance Program (Temple University Beasley School of Law) (2019-04-09)
      This webinar looks at the use of policy surveillance in research, particularly its application and integration with other datasets and sources, and its uptake by researchers. The presenters share their experiences, and identify lessons learned and emerging best practices.
    • Exploring Policy Surveillance: Policy Surveillance Methods and Standards

      Center for Public Health Law Research (Temple University Beasley School of Law); Policy Surveillance Program (Temple University Beasley School of Law) (2019-01-15)
      This webinar briefly introduces the practice of policy surveillance and its role in legal epidemiology and public health law practice. It also reviews current methodological best practices for quality control and data presentation.
    • Health Equity In Housing Webinar Series: Part 1: Creating Equitable, Diverse Neighborhoods and Communities

      Center for Public Health Law Research (Temple University Beasley School of Law); National Center for Healthy Housing; National Low Income Housing Coalition (2020-07-23)
      The housing system extends beyond the four walls of an individual’s home. In "Creating Equitable, Diverse Neighborhoods and Communities," the first webinar in our three-part series, presenters from the Temple University Center for Public Health Law Research, Oak Park Regional Housing Center, and the Inclusive Communities Project will define the concept of health equity in housing, particularly as it relates to creating communities that are equitable and diverse. They will examine strategies to achieve this goal by introducing a case study on Oak Park, Illinois, and discussing housing mobility and the role research and evaluation play in supporting that goal.
    • Health Equity In Housing Webinar Series: Part 2: Building and Maintaining Safe and Affordable Homes

      Center for Public Health Law Research (Temple University Beasley School of Law); National Center for Healthy Housing; National Low Income Housing Coalition (2020-09-03)
      In "Building and Maintaining Safe and Affordable Homes," the second webinar in our three-part series, presenters from the Temple University Center for Public Health Law Research, the National Low Income Housing Coalition, and ChangeLab Solutions will explore research and best practices for how we can build health equity in housing by improving and maintaining housing quality and by increasing and maintaining housing affordability. The panelists will revisit the goal of health equity in housing and the importance of a holistic systems approach before exploring research and existing efforts to increase access to safe and affordable housing, support housing code enforcement, and ensure healthy housing for all.
    • Health Reform and the Preservation of Confidential Health Care for Young Adults

      Center for Public Health Law Research (Temple University Beasley School of Law) (2014-03-25)
      A major issue facing the health of young adults is the often unintentional lack of confidentiality maintained in the provision of sensitive health services. Young adults who remain on their parents' health insurance plans may forgo sensitive services such as STD screening and treatment, family planning services and mental health treatment out of a concern that explanation of benefits will inform their parents, the policyholders. While the Affordable Care Act will grant more young adults access to health care services, ensuring confidential care remains a challenge whenever the parent and not the patient is the policyholder. In their Critical Opportunities presentation, Ryan Cramer and Lauren Slive suggest strengthening the HIPAA Privacy Rule by adopting the Health Information Technology and Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) Act. The HITECH provision allows patients to demand that confidentiality be maintained when services are paid for in full out-of-pocket.
    • Public Health Accreditation

      Center for Public Health Law Research (Temple University Beasley School of Law) (2014-03-25)
      Legally requiring all public health departments to be accredited would improve their performance and accountability while promoting community collaboration, according to this Critical Opportunities presentation by Georgia Heise, DrPH, Public Health Director of the Three Rivers District Health Department. The Critical Opportunities initiative of the Public Health Law Research (PHLR) program of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation presents evidence and ideas for proposed legal and policy changes that can positively impact public health challenges.
    • Reducing Pertussis Among Infants through Parental Vaccination

      Center for Public Health Law Research (Temple University Beasley School of Law) (2014-03-25)
      In this Critical Opportunity, Tamar Klaiman, PhD, MPH, suggests that providers should be required to offer pertussis vaccination prior to new parents leaving the hospital/birth center with a newborn. The Critical Opportunities initiative of the Public Health Law Research (PHLR) program of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation presents evidence and ideas for proposed legal and policy changes that can positively impact public health challenges.
    • Strengthening Injury Prevention in State Health Departments

      Center for Public Health Law Research (Temple University Beasley School of Law) (2014-03-25)
      Adoption of a model statute could help strengthen injury prevention explains Mel Kohn MD MPH, Public Health Director, Oregon Health Authority, in his Critical Opportunities presentation. This presentation was delivered at the 2012 APHA Annual Meeting.