Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorBriand, Lisa A.
dc.creatorMcGrath, Anna
dc.date.accessioned2022-01-17T16:14:04Z
dc.date.available2022-01-17T16:14:04Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12613/7180
dc.description.abstractSocial isolation during adolescence can have long lasting negative effects in both humans and animal models. In mice, post-weaning social isolation leads to increased addiction-like behaviors in adulthood. However, little is known about how post-weaning social isolation alters the brain. Stress during development can lead to persistent restructuring of neurons. Changes in dendritic spines can be long-lasting and have been theorized to play an important role in the maintenance of cocaine craving. We found that post-weaning isolation led to a persistent increase in spine density in adulthood within both the core and shell regions of the nucleus accumbens in male mice, but not female mice. In contrast, in the infralimbic cortex, post-weaning social isolation led to an increase in spine density only in female mice. This study highlights the long-lasting, sex-specific effects of post-weaning isolation. Microglia have been shown to assist in both the formation and elimination of dendritic spines, and are activated following exposure to stress and cocaine. Therefore, we hypothesized that microglia may be involved in the restructuring of dendritic spines during post-weaning isolation, and contribute to addiction-like behavior in adulthood. We examined whether inhibiting microglia with minocycline during the first three weeks of post-weaning isolation altered the impact of isolation in cocaine seeking. Isolated animals that received minocycline showed increased cocaine seeking in adulthood compared to group housed mice and isolated mice that received saline. Minocycline and isolation also caused sex-specific alterations in spine density. The findings of these studies provide insight into the mechanisms by which social isolation during adolescence increases vulnerability to addiction later in life.
dc.format.extent111 pages
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherTemple University. Libraries
dc.relation.ispartofTheses and Dissertations
dc.rightsIN COPYRIGHT- This Rights Statement can be used for an Item that is in copyright. Using this statement implies that the organization making this Item available has determined that the Item is in copyright and either is the rights-holder, has obtained permission from the rights-holder(s) to make their Work(s) available, or makes the Item available under an exception or limitation to copyright (including Fair Use) that entitles it to make the Item available.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectPsychology
dc.subjectNeurosciences
dc.subjectAddiction
dc.subjectCocaine
dc.subjectDendritic spines
dc.subjectIsolation
dc.subjectMicroglia
dc.titlePOST-WEANING SOCIAL ISOLATION ALTERS ADDICTION-LIKE BEHAVIORS AND SYNAPTIC PLASTICITY IN THE NUCLEUS ACCUMBENS AND PREFRONTAL CORTEX: ROLE OF SEX AND NEUROIMMUNE SIGNALING
dc.typeText
dc.type.genreThesis/Dissertation
dc.contributor.committeememberBangasser, Debra A.
dc.contributor.committeememberWimmer, Mathieu
dc.contributor.committeememberParikh, Vinay
dc.contributor.committeememberJarcho, Johanna
dc.contributor.committeememberWard, Sara Jane
dc.description.departmentPsychology
dc.relation.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.34944/dspace/7159
dc.ada.noteFor Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accommodation, including help with reading this content, please contact scholarshare@temple.edu
dc.description.degreePh.D.
dc.identifier.proqst14721
dc.creator.orcid0000-0002-5615-8849
dc.date.updated2022-01-11T05:03:39Z
refterms.dateFOA2022-01-17T16:14:05Z
dc.identifier.filenameMcGrath_temple_0225E_14721.pdf


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
McGrath_temple_0225E_14721.pdf
Size:
17.73Mb
Format:
PDF

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record