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dc.creatorZhu, Lin
dc.date.accessioned2021-11-09T15:58:41Z
dc.date.available2021-11-09T15:58:41Z
dc.date.issued2017-06-03
dc.identifier.citationZhu L. Depression Risks and Correlates among Different Generations of Chinese Americans: The Effects of Relationships with Friends and Relatives. Social Sciences. 2017; 6(2):56. https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci6020056
dc.identifier.issn2076-0760
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.34944/dspace/7107
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12613/7127
dc.description.abstractAn increasing body of literature has suggested that the public portrayal of Chinese Americans as a high-achieving, well-adjusting “model minority” might not reflect the entire reality of their mental health conditions. This study examined depression risks and correlates among different generations of Chinese Americans, using non-Hispanic whites as a comparison group. A nationally representative sample of Chinese Americans (n = 600) from the Comprehensive Psychiatric Epidemiological Survey was used. Results of the study indicate that Chinese Americans in general have a lower risk of depression than non-Hispanic whites. Moreover, the prevalence and correlates of depression do not show a linear trend of difference from first to second to third-or-higher generation Chinese Americans, and then to non-Hispanic whites; rather, the risk of depression and its association with social relational factors presents in distinctive patterns for first and second generation Chinese Americans, compared to third-or-higher generation Chinese Americans and non-Hispanic whites. Specifically, friend network and relative group play different roles in influencing depression for different generations of Chinese Americans. The findings contributed to the growing body of literature on acculturation and mental health among immigrants, shedding lights on the complicated sociocultural contexts that could influence the mental well-being of individuals. Mental health service providers need to be aware of the complex and nuanced association between social relational factors and depression in their prevention, management, and treatment efforts.
dc.format.extent18 pages
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofFaculty/ Researcher Works
dc.relation.haspartSocial Sciences, Vol. 6, No. 56
dc.relation.isreferencedbyMDPI
dc.rightsAttribution CC BY
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectDepression
dc.subjectSocial network
dc.subjectChinese Americans
dc.subjectSocial support
dc.subjectSocial conflict
dc.subjectGenerational status
dc.titleDepression Risks and Correlates among Different Generations of Chinese Americans: The Effects of Relationships with Friends and Relatives
dc.typeText
dc.type.genreJournal article
dc.contributor.groupCenter for Asian Health (Temple University)
dc.description.departmentClinical Sciences
dc.relation.doihttps://doi.org/10.3390/socsci6020056
dc.ada.noteFor Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accommodation, including help with reading this content, please contact scholarshare@temple.edu
dc.description.schoolcollegeLewis Katz School of Medicine
dc.creator.orcidZhu|0000-0002-4671-1129
dc.temple.creatorZhu, Lin
refterms.dateFOA2021-11-09T15:58:42Z


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