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dc.contributor.advisorAlloy, Lauren
dc.creatorMac Giollabhui, Naoise
dc.date.accessioned2021-09-14T15:37:57Z
dc.date.available2021-09-14T15:37:57Z
dc.date.issued2022
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12613/6946
dc.description.abstractCognitive functioning is disrupted during a depressive episode and cognitive dysfunction persists when depression is in remission. A subtype of depressed individuals who exhibit elevated inflammatory biomarkers may be at particular risk for cognitive dysfunction. We examined whether an elevated inflammatory biomarker (C-reactive protein: CRP) in acute and/or remitted depression was associated with specific deficits in executive functioning, episodic memory, and verbal fluency. Data were drawn from a population-based sample of Dutch adolescents (N = 1,066; 46% male) recruited at the age of 11 and followed over the course of eight years. We tested whether adolescents with either, (i) a history of depression (Wave 1 – 3) or (ii) current depression (Wave 4), and elevated levels of C-reactive protein measured in blood at Wave 3 performed worse on cognitive assessments at Wave 4. Eight measures of cognitive functioning were hypothesized to load on to one of three dimensions of cognitive functioning (executive functioning, episodic memory, and verbal fluency) within a structural equation model framework. Higher levels of CRP were associated with worse future executive functioning in adolescents with and without current/prior depression. A current depression diagnosis also was associated with worse future executive functioning. There was consistent evidence linking low socioeconomic status and health-related covariates (high body mass index/sedentary behavior) with worse performance across multiple measures of cognitive functioning and, importantly, the association of depression/CRP and executive functioning was no longer significant when controlling for these covariates. Future studies may benefit from investigating whether specific depressogenic behaviors (e.g., sedentary behavior/substance use) mediate a relationship between depression and worse executive functioning, potentially via a prospective pathway through elevated inflammation.
dc.format.extent123 pages
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherTemple University. Libraries
dc.relation.ispartofTheses and Dissertations
dc.rightsIN COPYRIGHT- This Rights Statement can be used for an Item that is in copyright. Using this statement implies that the organization making this Item available has determined that the Item is in copyright and either is the rights-holder, has obtained permission from the rights-holder(s) to make their Work(s) available, or makes the Item available under an exception or limitation to copyright (including Fair Use) that entitles it to make the Item available.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectClinical psychology
dc.subjectAdolescence
dc.subjectC reactive protein
dc.subjectCognitive functioning
dc.subjectDepression
dc.subjectExecutive functioning
dc.subjectInflammation
dc.titleChronic Inflammation as a Pathway Leading to Cognitive Dysfunction in Depressed Youth
dc.typeText
dc.type.genreThesis/Dissertation
dc.contributor.committeememberEllman, Lauren
dc.contributor.committeememberGiovannetti, Tania
dc.contributor.committeememberOlino, Thomas
dc.contributor.committeememberKendall, Philip
dc.contributor.committeememberMurty, Vishnu
dc.description.departmentPsychology
dc.relation.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.34944/dspace/6928
dc.ada.noteFor Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accommodation, including help with reading this content, please contact scholarshare@temple.edu
dc.description.degreePh.D.
dc.identifier.proqst14528
dc.creator.orcid0000-0003-4226-5704
dc.date.updated2021-09-13T16:04:01Z
refterms.dateFOA2021-09-14T15:37:58Z
dc.identifier.filenameMacGiollabhui_temple_0225E_14528.pdf


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