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dc.contributor.advisorSciote, James J.
dc.creatorJolly, Lisa R
dc.date.accessioned2021-08-23T18:14:42Z
dc.date.available2021-08-23T18:14:42Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12613/6885
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: The Modified Mallampati Tongue Score (MMT) is commonly used in anesthesiology for the pre-anesthetic assessment of the airway in patients. This score roughly estimates the size and position of the tongue relative to the oral cavity, with higher scores associated with difficult intubation and increased incidence of breathing interferences, such as obstructive sleep apnea. The distance from the tongue base to roof of the mouth decreases from MMT-I to MMT-IV. The tongue shape and position impact the airway patency in the hypopharynx, contributing to changes in craniofacial head posture followed by changes in craniofacial morphology. This present study examines the pattern of associations between the Modified Mallampati Tongue Score positions and 1) the postural relationship of the cranium, hyoid bone, cervical column, and tongue 2) size, shape, and position of the craniofacial components, as depicted in a lateral cephalogram. Methods: This retrospective study was performed on 200 subjects (145 female, 55 male) prior to starting orthodontic treatment. MMT was assessed from one photograph of maximum mouth opening and tongue protrusion. Pretreatment cephalograms were analyzed to evaluate craniocervical posture, resting tongue position, hyoid bone position, or sagittal and vertical skeletal relationships. MMT (I-IV) was also compared to basic demographics (age, gender, race/ethnicity). One-way ANOVA, Chi-square test, and correlation analysis were used for statistical analysis. Probability values <0.05 were accepted as significant. Results: A total of 200 patients (72.5% Female, 27.5% Male, 54% African American), with a mean age of 20 (Range 7-73), were included for the study. MMT-III was most prevalent (34%). MMT was not associated with age, gender, or race/ethnicity. Mean cephalometric measurements of hyoid position (p=0.06-0.03), mandibular position (p=0.006), ANB (p=0.009), and SNB (p=0.023, were shown to have significant differences with MMT. MMT positively correlated with the ANB (p=0.001), Wits (p=0.016), vertical position of the hyoid bone to neck (p=0.004) and mandible (p=0.048); and inversely correlated with the SNB (p=0.003) and Pog:Na-Perp (p=0.045). Conclusion: A higher MMT correlates to a Class II skeletal morphology and extended craniofacial posture. Preliminary results suggest high tongue position influences Class II craniofacial morphology, enhancing maxillary prognathic growth and mandibular deficiency. This indicates that MMT can be a potential predictor of craniofacial growth patterns, strengthening the prognosis and long-term stability of orthodontic treatment.
dc.format.extent84 pages
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherTemple University. Libraries
dc.relation.ispartofTheses and Dissertations
dc.rightsIN COPYRIGHT- This Rights Statement can be used for an Item that is in copyright. Using this statement implies that the organization making this Item available has determined that the Item is in copyright and either is the rights-holder, has obtained permission from the rights-holder(s) to make their Work(s) available, or makes the Item available under an exception or limitation to copyright (including Fair Use) that entitles it to make the Item available.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectDentistry
dc.subjectCephalogram
dc.subjectCraniofacial growth
dc.subjectCraniofacial morphology
dc.subjectCraniofacial posture
dc.subjectMallampati
dc.subjectTongue
dc.titleCORRELATION BETWEEN MODIFIED MALLAMPATI TONGUE SCORE WITH VARIATION IN CRANIOFACIAL POSTURE & MORPHOLOGY IN A LATERAL CEPHALOGRAM
dc.typeText
dc.type.genreThesis/Dissertation
dc.contributor.committeememberGodel, Jeffrey H.
dc.contributor.committeememberMoore, John V., III
dc.description.departmentOral Biology
dc.relation.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.34944/dspace/6867
dc.ada.noteFor Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accommodation, including help with reading this content, please contact scholarshare@temple.edu
dc.description.degreeM.S.
dc.identifier.proqst14598
dc.date.updated2021-08-21T10:08:00Z
refterms.dateFOA2021-08-23T18:14:43Z
dc.identifier.filenameJolly_temple_0225M_14598.pdf


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