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dc.contributor.advisorGunderson, Elizabeth
dc.creatorRen, Kexin
dc.date.accessioned2021-08-23T17:55:51Z
dc.date.available2021-08-23T17:55:51Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12613/6855
dc.description.abstractStudents tend to choose a field of study in which they believe they possess the most skills by comparing their performance across different domains, such as math and English. These intraindividual comparisons between domains are known as dimensional comparisons (Möller & Marsh, 2013). There are individual differences in dimensional comparisons, such that some students engage in stronger comparisons than others do, yet few studies have examined the sources of these individual differences. In addition to objective performance, students sometimes also receive subjective feedback (e.g., praise) from parents and teachers. However, it is unknown whether and how this feedback influences dimensional comparisons to shape students’ domain-specific motivational beliefs. Therefore, we first examined whether theories of intelligence (TOIs) moderated dimensional comparison processes in different age groups in two studies. We then investigated whether receiving disproportionate praise in different domains affected students’ domain-specific motivational beliefs. Results showed that incremental TOI moderated math grades’ relation to verbal competence self-concepts in 10th and 11th graders (N = 140). It also moderated verbal grades’ relation to verbal intrinsic values in 1st- to 5th-year college students (N = 136). However, we did not find such moderations in other age groups. Regarding the praise manipulation, 7th to 9th graders (N = 108) showed heightened verbal competence self-concepts after receiving praise on either math or verbal performance. First- to fifth-year college students also showed increased verbal intrinsic values after receiving praise on verbal performance. TOI moderated students’ responses to praise manipulations. These studies shed light on students’ development of domain-specific motivational beliefs and inspire future research.
dc.format.extent112 pages
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherTemple University. Libraries
dc.relation.ispartofTheses and Dissertations
dc.rightsIN COPYRIGHT- This Rights Statement can be used for an Item that is in copyright. Using this statement implies that the organization making this Item available has determined that the Item is in copyright and either is the rights-holder, has obtained permission from the rights-holder(s) to make their Work(s) available, or makes the Item available under an exception or limitation to copyright (including Fair Use) that entitles it to make the Item available.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectDevelopmental psychology
dc.subjectEducational psychology
dc.subjectDimensional comparisons
dc.subjectFeedback
dc.subjectMath motivation
dc.subjectPraise
dc.subjectTheories of intelligence
dc.subjectVerbal motivation
dc.titleARE STUDENTS' MATH AND VERBAL BELIEFS MALLEABLE? THE ROLES OF THEORIES OF INTELLIGENCE AND PRAISE
dc.typeText
dc.type.genreThesis/Dissertation
dc.contributor.committeememberWeinraub, Marsha
dc.contributor.committeememberHirsh-Pasek, Kathy
dc.contributor.committeememberNewcombe, Nora
dc.contributor.committeememberMurty, Vishnu
dc.contributor.committeememberHindman, Annemarie H.
dc.description.departmentPsychology
dc.relation.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.34944/dspace/6837
dc.ada.noteFor Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accommodation, including help with reading this content, please contact scholarshare@temple.edu
dc.description.degreePh.D.
dc.identifier.proqst14578
dc.date.updated2021-08-21T10:07:24Z
refterms.dateFOA2021-08-23T17:55:52Z
dc.identifier.filenameRen_temple_0225E_14578.pdf


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