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dc.contributor.advisorLiu, Haijun
dc.creatorDong, Qian
dc.date.accessioned2021-08-23T17:50:07Z
dc.date.available2021-08-23T17:50:07Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12613/6841
dc.description.abstractAcoustic-structural interaction is the key to understand a wide range of engineering problems such as membrane-based dynamic pressure sensors, hearing devices for sound source localization, and acoustic absorbers for noise reduction. Despite tremendous developments in the last decades, there is still a fundamental size limitation in these areas. In the case of dynamic pressure sensors, sensitivity usually suffers for miniature sensors; the available acoustic directional cues proportionally decrease with size, which adversely affects the localization performance; thick panels are required to achieve superior sound attenuation, particularly for low-frequency sound. It is the motivation of this dissertation research to address the abovementioned size limitation that involves acoustic-structural interaction. The overall goal of this dissertation work is to achieve an enhanced understanding of the acoustic-structural interaction between diaphragms and air cavity and to apply this understanding to develop high-performance miniature acoustic sensors and noise reduction metamaterials. First, a finite element method (FEM) model and large-scale device are developed to understand how the interaction between the diaphragm and its backing air cavity affects the equivalent mass, stiffness, and damping of air-backed diaphragms. The numerical and experimental study shows that the complex interaction cannot be captured by the commonly used lump model. Then, air-backed graphene diaphragms are used to develop fiber optic sensors with sub-millimeters footprint and high sensitivity. Two different configurations are designed to enhance the sensor sensitivity limited by the backing air cavity. One is to increase the mechanical sensitivity by using a larger backing volume, the other is to increase the optical sensitivity by using silver-graphene composite diaphragm. Next, acoustic metamaterials with air-coupled diaphragms as unit cells are developed to achieve perfect acoustic absorption with thickness much smaller than the sound wavelength, which cannot be realized using natural materials. Finally, an expanded configuration of two diaphragms coupled by an air-filled tunnel is experimentally developed to mimic the hearing system of small vertebrates. The goal is to amplify the small directional cues available to the small animals so that a high angular resolution can be achieved. This dissertation provides a quantitative and mechanistic explanation for the interaction between the diaphragms and the sealed air cavity. It offers several frameworks for the development of miniature pressures, directional sensors, and thin sound absorbers.
dc.format.extent122 pages
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherTemple University. Libraries
dc.relation.ispartofTheses and Dissertations
dc.rightsIN COPYRIGHT- This Rights Statement can be used for an Item that is in copyright. Using this statement implies that the organization making this Item available has determined that the Item is in copyright and either is the rights-holder, has obtained permission from the rights-holder(s) to make their Work(s) available, or makes the Item available under an exception or limitation to copyright (including Fair Use) that entitles it to make the Item available.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectAcoustics
dc.subjectAcoustic metamaterials
dc.subjectBio-inspired sensor
dc.subjectPressure transducer
dc.titleAcoustic-structural interaction: understanding and application in sensor development and metamaterials
dc.typeText
dc.type.genreThesis/Dissertation
dc.contributor.committeememberLiu, Ling
dc.contributor.committeememberKim, Albert
dc.contributor.committeememberZhang, Yimin
dc.description.departmentMechanical Engineering
dc.relation.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.34944/dspace/6823
dc.ada.noteFor Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accommodation, including help with reading this content, please contact scholarshare@temple.edu
dc.description.degreePh.D.
dc.identifier.proqst14565
dc.date.updated2021-08-21T10:07:08Z
refterms.dateFOA2021-08-23T17:50:07Z
dc.identifier.filenameDong_temple_0225E_14565.pdf


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