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dc.contributor.advisorSimon, Bryant
dc.creatorDirkson, Menika Belicia
dc.date.accessioned2021-08-23T17:49:16Z
dc.date.available2021-08-23T17:49:16Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12613/6837
dc.description.abstractDuring the Great Migration (1916-1970) of African Americans to the North, Philadelphia’s police department, journalists, and city officials used news media to disseminate crime narratives laced with statistics and racial stereotypes of “black invasions,” “urban neighborhood jungles,” “roving black gangs,” and the “culture of poverty” to convince the white middle-class to resist desegregation and support tough on crime policing in the inner city from 1958 to the present-day. However, African Americans experienced double victimization from the proliferation of these crime narratives. Police and journalists used crime narratives to justify the racially-biased policing tactics of hyper-surveillance, daily patrols, excessive force, and incarceration against black and poor residents. Over time, city officials developed a system of racial capitalism in which City Council financially divested from social welfare programs, invested in the police department, and promoted a tough on crime policing program that generated wealth for Philadelphia’s tax base and attempted to halt white flight from the city. My evidence consists of newspapers, archived news reel, municipal court dockets, census records, oral histories, interviews, police investigation reports, housing project pamphlets, and maps to demonstrate that a consequence of tough on crime policing was hyper-surveillance, the use of excessive force, and neglect by officers in the most disadvantaged areas of the city: poor, segregated, and black-inhabited housing projects and neighborhoods. Nevertheless, by looking through the lens of Philadelphia specifically, I emphasize that the budgetary strategy of a city government spending more money on policing and corrections than social welfare programs is ineffective and a form of racial capitalism which relies on criminal scapegoating, continues the cycle of poverty-induced crime, inflates rates of incarceration and police brutality, and marginalizes poor people of color.
dc.format.extent320 pages
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherTemple University. Libraries
dc.relation.ispartofTheses and Dissertations
dc.rightsIN COPYRIGHT- This Rights Statement can be used for an Item that is in copyright. Using this statement implies that the organization making this Item available has determined that the Item is in copyright and either is the rights-holder, has obtained permission from the rights-holder(s) to make their Work(s) available, or makes the Item available under an exception or limitation to copyright (including Fair Use) that entitles it to make the Item available.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectHistory
dc.subjectBlack history
dc.subjectCriminology
dc.subjectAfrican Americans
dc.subjectCriminalization
dc.subjectMigration
dc.subjectPhiladelphia
dc.subjectPolicing
dc.subjectRacial capitalism
dc.titleHope and Struggle in the Policed Inner-City: Black Criminalization and Racial Capitalism in Philadelphia, 1914-1978
dc.typeText
dc.type.genreThesis/Dissertation
dc.contributor.committeememberBerman, Lila Corwin, 1976-
dc.contributor.committeememberNeptune, Harvey R., 1970-
dc.contributor.committeememberHinton, Elizabeth Kai, 1983-
dc.contributor.committeememberLombardo, Timothy J.
dc.description.departmentHistory
dc.relation.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.34944/dspace/6819
dc.ada.noteFor Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accommodation, including help with reading this content, please contact scholarshare@temple.edu
dc.description.degreePh.D.
dc.identifier.proqst14614
dc.date.updated2021-08-21T10:08:28Z
dc.embargo.lift08/17/2023
dc.identifier.filenameDirkson_temple_0225E_14614.pdf


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