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dc.creatorClarke, Rachel Ivy
dc.creatorBell, Steven
dc.date.accessioned2021-08-12T15:46:45Z
dc.date.available2021-08-12T15:46:45Z
dc.date.issued2021-07-30
dc.identifier.citationClarke, R. I., & Bell, S. (2021). “Attitudes and Perceptions Towards Design Thinking in Graduate Level Library Education.” Journal of Education for Library and Information Science 62(3), 303-325. DOI: https://doi.org/10.3138/jelis.2020-0028
dc.identifier.issn2328-2967
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.34944/dspace/6786
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12613/6804
dc.description.abstractThis study aims to understand educators’—specifically those in positions of authority in graduate-level library education programs—perceptions of and attitudes toward design thinking and methods in graduate-level library curricula by investigating the following research questions: What is the current landscape for the integration of design into the LIS curriculum, from the program director’s perspective? What do these directors think about the competencies required for future librarians, and where does design fit into those competencies? What are the possibilities for a future degree focused on reconceptualizing the field from a design perspective rather than the traditional library science? Thirteen MLIS program directors and people in equivalent positions at ALA-accredited programs in the United States and Canada were interviewed to investigate these queries. The conversations suggest there is a growing openness to design education that may contribute to the diversification of the curriculum so that graduates’ competencies more closely reflect recommendations in the literature and address the needs of employers. They also reveal dichotomies in how LIS program directors define and integrate design education into LIS curricula, such as barriers of bureaucratic concerns versus interest in experimenting with design courses available elsewhere in their universities, or even the potential for a dual library science/library design degree option. The article concludes with recommendations for next steps in advancing design in library education so as to prepare graduates for the growing number of user experience, public programming, or even more traditional teaching librarian positions where a design thinking approach leads to effective practice.
dc.format.extent27 pages
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofTemple University Libraries
dc.relation.haspartJournal of Education for Library and Information Science, Vol. 62 Iss. 3, July 2021
dc.relation.isreferencedbyAssociation for Library and Information Science Education (ALISE)
dc.rightsAll Rights Reserved
dc.subjectCurriculum
dc.subjectDesign
dc.subjectDesign thinking
dc.subjectLIS education
dc.titleAttitudes and Perceptions toward Design Thinking in Graduate-Level Library Education
dc.typeText
dc.type.genrePost-print
dc.relation.doihttps://doi.org/10.3138/jelis.2020-0028
dc.ada.noteFor Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accommodation, including help with reading this content, please contact scholarshare@temple.edu
dc.description.schoolcollegeTemple University. Libraries
dc.creator.orcid0000-0003-3916-4013
dc.temple.creatorBell, Steven J.
refterms.dateFOA2021-08-12T15:46:46Z


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