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dc.creatorLee, Jennifer J.
dc.date.accessioned2021-07-29T14:37:48Z
dc.date.available2021-07-29T14:37:48Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.citationJennifer J. Lee, Redefining the Legality of Undocumented Work, 106 CAL. L. REV. 1617 (2018).
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.34944/dspace/6738
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12613/6756
dc.description.abstractUndocumented workers face a new harsh reality under the Trump administration. Federal law's prohibition of undocumented work has facilitated exploitation because workers fear being brought to the attention of immigration authorities. The current administration's aggressive stance towards worksite enforcement will only exacerbate abuses against undocumented workers, such as wage theft, dangerous working conditions, or human trafficking. Given the current climate, this Essay explores how states and localities can resist the federal prohibition by legalizing undocumented work. We live in times of resistance, with sanctuary cities that refuse to cooperate with federal immigration enforcement. Seizing on this moment, state and local resistance can offer more immediate accountability for addressing the plight of undocumented workers while disrupting the ways in which the federal immigration framework defines the illegality of undocumented work. To start, this Essay reviews how the incongruence between the lived experiences of undocumented workers and the federal immigration framework creates an underclass of workers. Next, it develops a typology of state and local resistance measures that recognize, protect, or promote undocumented work and considers whether these measures can succeed given concerns about federalism and governmental retaliation. This Essay concludes by discussing why state and local resistance is worthwhile. Beyond the palpable benefits of addressing exploitation, state and local resistance can help undocumented workers overcome exclusion by increasing their sense of belonging. Community members also benefit from the strengthening of workers' rights and the contributions to the local economy. At the same time, such resistance changes social norms and provides a powerful critique of the federal prohibition on undocumented work. Ultimately, this Essay is the first to examine how state and local resistance focused on undocumented work can lend itself to building social movements that promote immigrant inclusion by redefining the legality of undocumented work.
dc.format.extent40 pages
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofFaculty/ Researcher Works
dc.relation.haspartCalifornia Law Review, Vol. 106, Iss. 5
dc.relation.isreferencedbyCopyright © 2018 California Law Review, Inc.
dc.rightsAll Rights Reserved
dc.subjectImmigration
dc.subjectImmigrant workers
dc.subjectUndocumented workers
dc.subjectState and local resistance
dc.subjectSanctuary City
dc.titleRedefining the Legality of Undocumented Work
dc.typeText
dc.type.genreJournal article
dc.relation.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.15779/Z38TH8BN20
dc.ada.noteFor Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accommodation, including help with reading this content, please contact scholarshare@temple.edu
dc.description.schoolcollegeTemple University. James E. Beasley School of Law
dc.temple.creatorLee, Jennifer J.
refterms.dateFOA2021-07-29T14:37:48Z


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