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dc.creatorBaron, Jane B.
dc.creatorEpstein, Julia
dc.date.accessioned2021-07-08T19:53:09Z
dc.date.available2021-07-08T19:53:09Z
dc.date.issued1997
dc.identifier.citationJane B. Baron & Julia Epstein, Is Law Narrative?, 45 Buff. L. Rev. 141 (1997).
dc.identifier.citationAvailable at: https://digitalcommons.law.buffalo.edu/buffalolawreview/vol45/iss1/5
dc.identifier.issn0023-9356
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12613/6717
dc.description.abstractIs every statement in or about the law a story? Is every explanation of the law a narrative? Is all legal argumentation rhetorical? Maybe, but maybe not. Surely the answer depends on what is meant by the terms "story," "narrative," and "rhetorical." In this article, we argue that terms such as these, and claims that rely on them, require definition and clarification. Questions such as "is law narrative?" or "is law rhetorical?" implicate the tricky business of how meaning is made in law. If that is the issue, we ought to face it directly. That is the aim of this essay. In Part I we illustrate the narrative character of a traditional law review article. Our point is to show that it is relatively simple to see even the most conventional scholarly writing as containing and comprising a story. In Part II we examine whether our analysis in Part I is "fair" to the article, or whether it distorts in important ways what the article says. Our goal here is to demonstrate the epistemological positions at stake in the controversy over narrative. In Part III, we connect the debates about storytelling to contemporary debates over the possibility of neutrally or objectively discovering and representing facts. These debates have a peculiar valence and poignancy in law, where "finding the facts" has always seemed central to doing justice.
dc.format.extent48 pages
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofFaculty/ Researcher Works
dc.relation.haspartBuffalo Law Review, Vol. 45, No. 1 (1997)
dc.relation.isreferencedbyState University of New York at Buffalo, School of Law
dc.rightsAll Rights Reserved
dc.subjectLaw and literature
dc.subjectAnalysis
dc.subjectNarration (Rhetoric)
dc.titleIs Law Narrative?
dc.typeText
dc.type.genreJournal article
dc.relation.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.34944/dspace/6699
dc.ada.noteFor Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accommodation, including help with reading this content, please contact scholarshare@temple.edu
dc.description.schoolcollegeTemple University. James E. Beasley School of Law
dc.temple.creatorBaron, Jane B.
refterms.dateFOA2021-07-08T19:53:09Z


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