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dc.creatorWolf, Kerrin
dc.creatorKalinich, Mary Kate
dc.creatorDeJarnatt, Susan L.
dc.date.accessioned2021-06-29T16:17:38Z
dc.date.available2021-06-29T16:17:38Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.citationKerrin Wolf, Mary Kate Kalinich & Susan L. DeJarnatt, Charting School Discipline, 48 Urb. Law. 1 (2016).
dc.identifier.citationAvailable at: https://www.americanbar.org/groups/state_local_government/publications/urban_lawyer/2016/48-1/school-discipline/
dc.identifier.issn0042-0905
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12613/6647
dc.description.abstractExclusionary school discipline can steer students away from educational opportunities and towards the juvenile and criminal justice systems. As many public school systems have turned to exclusionary school discipline practices over the past two decades, they have also increasingly adopted charter schools as alternatives to traditional public schools. This research is examines the student codes of conduct for the charter schools in the School District of Philadelphia to consider the role of their disciplinary practices and the potential effects on charter students. We analyzed every disciplinary code provided to the Philadelphia School District by charter schools within Philadelphia during the 2014-2015 school year. Our goal was to examine the provisions relating to detention, suspension, and expulsion, along with other disciplinary responses, to determine what conduct can result in disciplinary consequences, what responses are available for various types of misbehavior, and whether the code language is clear or ambiguous or even accessible to students or potential students and their parents or caregivers. We conclude that too many of the codes are not well drafted, and too many follow models of punitive discipline that can be used to push out non-compliant or challenging students. Some codes grant almost complete discretion to school administrators to impose punitive discipline for any behavior the administrator deems problematic. We hope that this work will spur future research on implementation of charter school discipline policies to illustrate how charter schools are using their codes. Further, we hope to see the charter sector develop model disciplinary codes that move away from a zero tolerance punitive model towards disciplinary systems based on restorative principles.
dc.format.extent46 pages
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofFaculty/ Researcher Works
dc.relation.haspartThe Urban Lawyer, Vol. 48, Iss. 1
dc.relation.isreferencedbyAmerican Bar Association
dc.rightsAll Rights Reserved
dc.subjectExclusionary school discipline
dc.subjectCharter schools
dc.subjectSchool-to-prison pipeline
dc.subjectEducation reform
dc.subjectSuspension of charter students
dc.titleCharting School Discipline
dc.typeText
dc.type.genreJournal article
dc.relation.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.34944/dspace/6629
dc.ada.noteFor Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accommodation, including help with reading this content, please contact scholarshare@temple.edu
dc.description.schoolcollegeTemple University. James E. Beasley School of Law
dc.temple.creatorKalinich, Mary Kate
dc.temple.creatorDeJarnatt, Susan L.
refterms.dateFOA2021-06-29T16:17:39Z


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