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dc.contributor.advisorHenry, Kevin A.
dc.creatorWiese, Daniel
dc.date.accessioned2021-05-24T19:01:27Z
dc.date.available2021-05-24T19:01:27Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12613/6555
dc.description.abstractA primary reason geospatial approaches are important in cancer research is that health and disease are shaped not only by factors such as age, race/ethnicity, genes, and clinical care but also by the environment where individuals work and act. While the use of geospatial approaches in cancer research is growing, several limitations remain. For example, for most population-based studies, cancer patients' neighborhood environments are based on only a single location derived from the residence at the time of diagnosis.This dissertation aimed to address this limitation by using a unique dataset of colon cancer patients diagnosed in New Jersey that include residential histories obtained through a data linkage with LexisNexis, a commercial data collection company. By incorporating residential histories, I moved beyond a cross-sectional approach to examine how residential histories and socio-spatial mobility can change a patient’s geographic context over time and influence survival. To demonstrate the application of these data in this dissertation, I completed three case studies. In the first case study, I compared whether including residential histories changed the risk of death estimates by neighborhood poverty compared to the traditional approach when including only the location at the time of diagnosis. Results suggested that the risk of death estimates from neighborhood poverty were generally similar in strength and direction regardless of residential histories inclusion. This finding was likely a result of minimal socio-spatial mobility of colon cancer patients (i.e., patients generally moving to census tracts with similar poverty levels). The second study aimed to compare the geographic risk of death estimates when using single location and residential histories in spatial models. Results overall showed that the geographic patterns of the risk of death estimates were generally similar between the models. However, not accounting for residential mobility resulted in underestimated geographic risk of death in several areas. This finding was related to the fact that approximately 35% of the colon cancer patients changed the residency, and 12% of the initial study population left New Jersey after the diagnosis. In the third case study, I examined whether landscape characteristics (e.g., built environment) were associated with the risk of death from colon cancer independent of individual-level factors, residential mobility, and neighborhood poverty. The results indicated that an increasing proportion of high-intensity developed-lands substantially increased the risk of death, while an increase in the aggregation and connectivity of vegetation-dominated low-intensity developed-lands reduced the risk of death. These findings suggested that places lacking greenspaces could have worse access to recreational sites that promote physical activity. Overall, this dissertation expands our knowledge about the geographic disparities in colon cancer in New Jersey. It also provides specific examples of integrating residential histories and remote sensing-based products into cancer disparities research. Including residential histories opens up new avenues of inquiry to better understand the complex relationships between people and places, and the effect of residential mobility on cancer outcomes. Combining multiple socio-demographic and environmental domains to estimate the neighborhood effects on cancer outcomes will increase our potential to understand the underlying pathways.
dc.format.extent139 pages
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherTemple University. Libraries
dc.relation.ispartofTheses and Dissertations
dc.rightsIN COPYRIGHT- This Rights Statement can be used for an Item that is in copyright. Using this statement implies that the organization making this Item available has determined that the Item is in copyright and either is the rights-holder, has obtained permission from the rights-holder(s) to make their Work(s) available, or makes the Item available under an exception or limitation to copyright (including Fair Use) that entitles it to make the Item available.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectGeography
dc.subjectHealth sciences
dc.subjectGeographic information science and geodesy
dc.subjectCancer disparities
dc.subjectColon cancer
dc.subjectGeographic disparities
dc.subjectHealth disparities
dc.subjectSpatial modeling
dc.titleGEOSPATIAL APPROACHES FOR UNDERSTANDING THE ROLE OF RESIDENTIAL MOBILITY AND AREA-LEVEL FACTORS IN COLON CANCER SURVIVAL DISPARITIES.
dc.typeText
dc.type.genreThesis/Dissertation
dc.contributor.committeememberHenry, Kevin A.
dc.contributor.committeememberLynch, Shannon M.
dc.contributor.committeememberGutierrez-Velez, Victor H.
dc.contributor.committeememberSchroeder, Krista
dc.description.departmentGeography
dc.relation.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.34944/dspace/6537
dc.ada.noteFor Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accommodation, including help with reading this content, please contact scholarshare@temple.edu
dc.description.degreePh.D.
dc.identifier.proqst14495
dc.creator.orcid0000-0002-1603-7583
dc.date.updated2021-05-19T19:06:13Z
dc.embargo.lift05/19/2022
dc.identifier.filenameWiese_temple_0225E_14495.pdf


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