Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorKlugman, Joshua
dc.creatorLaParo, Kendall
dc.date.accessioned2021-05-24T18:57:11Z
dc.date.available2021-05-24T18:57:11Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12613/6541
dc.description.abstractMy dissertation examines the enrollment patterns of White children in traditional U.S. public schools in 2010. I link schools to their attendance boundaries to compare the percentage of White children living in a catchment area to the percentage of White children who attend the local neighborhood school. I find that just under a third of schools are roughly representative of their catchment area (29%), the plurality are underrepresented White (40%), and the remaining 31% are overrepresented White. Descriptive analyses determine that White underrepresentation is more common in urban schools. White underrepresented schools tend to be in poorer neighborhoods and have a higher-than-average share of students in poverty and students with limited English proficiency. I investigate whether there is a connection between White representation and school quality outcomes. I focus on four facets of school quality that I hypothesize might be responsive to White representation: 1) school funding metrics, 2) school-supporting nonprofit presence, 3) standardized test scores, and 4) Gifted and Talented programming. Overall, the findings here offer mixed support for the theory of “opportunity hoarding,” in which White underrepresented schools receive fewer resources. Taken together, descriptive analyses find that White underrepresentation is largely associated with negative outcomes. White underrepresented schools have less public and charitable funding than their peers. White underrepresented schools are lower performing academically than White overrepresented schools, although they are not clearly academically different from representative White schools. White underrepresented schools are not necessarily less likely to have a GAT program, but when they do have a GAT program, it disproportionately targets White students. Furthermore, multivariate analyses reveal that the bivariate relationships between White representation and school outcomes are not entirely explained by the percentage of White students in a school, nor other covariates. This suggests that there is a meaningful distinction between White representation and the percentage of White students in a school. In other words, White representation tells us something about a school, net of the presence of White students. However, this was not the case for every multivariate model in the study. I find a significant negative association between White representation and school funding. White underrepresented schools have significantly lower mean teacher salaries and per-pupil salary expenditures, net of the percentage of White students within the school. This could be evidence that disproportionately low White enrollment leads to diminished school resources or less experienced teachers. Alternately, it could be that White families are more adept than non-White families at avoiding under-resourced schools. I find no evidence of a connection between White representation and whether a school has a school-supporting nonprofit. Instead, the economic composition of the school appears to be a more important driver of school nonprofit presence and nonprofit revenue. I also find no connection between White representation and test scores. However, White representation appears to influence the racial composition of GAT programs. Schools that are less White than their neighborhoods tend to have GAT programs that are significantly Whiter than the schools.
dc.format.extent174 pages
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherTemple University. Libraries
dc.relation.ispartofTheses and Dissertations
dc.rightsIN COPYRIGHT- This Rights Statement can be used for an Item that is in copyright. Using this statement implies that the organization making this Item available has determined that the Item is in copyright and either is the rights-holder, has obtained permission from the rights-holder(s) to make their Work(s) available, or makes the Item available under an exception or limitation to copyright (including Fair Use) that entitles it to make the Item available.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectEducation
dc.subjectEducation
dc.subjectNonprofits
dc.subjectRacial composition
dc.subjectSchool funding
dc.subjectWhiteness
dc.titleWhite Representation in Neighborhood Schools: School Funding, Nonprofit Investment, and Academic Outcomes
dc.typeText
dc.type.genreThesis/Dissertation
dc.contributor.committeememberGoyette, Kimberly A.
dc.contributor.committeememberCordes, Sarah A.
dc.contributor.committeememberCandipan, Jennifer
dc.description.departmentSociology
dc.relation.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.34944/dspace/6523
dc.ada.noteFor Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accommodation, including help with reading this content, please contact scholarshare@temple.edu
dc.description.degreePh.D.
dc.identifier.proqst14462
dc.date.updated2021-05-19T16:10:57Z
refterms.dateFOA2021-05-24T18:57:12Z
dc.identifier.filenameLaParo_temple_0225E_14462.pdf


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
LaParo_temple_0225E_14462.pdf
Size:
1008.Kb
Format:
PDF

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record