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dc.contributor.advisorAndersson, Lynne Mary
dc.creatorTomlinson, Rachel
dc.date.accessioned2021-05-24T18:48:30Z
dc.date.available2021-05-24T18:48:30Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12613/6504
dc.description.abstractWorkplace wellness programs (WWP) were developed to support employees’ health behaviors and well-being. Although physical activity is incorporated into the definition of wellness and is a modifiable behavior that can both reduce the risk for chronic disease and lifestyle-related diseases and enhance health and well-being, performance of physical activity is often overlooked within WWP and the workplace in general. Rather than investigating organizational aspects of the WWP, this grounded theory-based study explored employees’ perceptions concerning how their organization facilitated their participation in physical activity within WWP. To provide a theoretical framework, Self-Determination Theory (SDT) from Ryan and Deci (2000) offered the lens to understand the employees’ motivation to participate in physical activity and Social Ecological Model (SEM) by Bronfenbrenner (1977) described the multiple levels of interaction between the employee and their organizational environment. The employees’ perceptions elucidated their decision-making process. The emergent themes were time management, advantageousness, need for movement, supervisor ambivalence, social / “gregarious” connection, messages from leadership, limited awareness, culture of health, and incentives and reimbursements. Three levels (individual, relational, and organizational) and three facets (barriers, bolsters, and facilitators) illustrated the relationships among these themes. These themes, levels, and facets are exemplified in the grounded theory model. Consequently, six implications for practice were illuminated for organizations to employ for encouraging their employees to join and actively participate in physical activity in the WWP and in the workplace in general, providing better health outcomes for employees and improving the organizations’ bottom line.
dc.format.extent162 pages
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherTemple University. Libraries
dc.relation.ispartofTheses and Dissertations
dc.rightsIN COPYRIGHT- This Rights Statement can be used for an Item that is in copyright. Using this statement implies that the organization making this Item available has determined that the Item is in copyright and either is the rights-holder, has obtained permission from the rights-holder(s) to make their Work(s) available, or makes the Item available under an exception or limitation to copyright (including Fair Use) that entitles it to make the Item available.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectKinesiology
dc.subjectPsychology
dc.subjectBusiness administration
dc.subjectBehavior change
dc.subjectCulture of health
dc.subjectExercise psychology
dc.subjectHuman resource management
dc.subjectMotivation
dc.subjectWorkplace wellness programs
dc.titleGet Moving: A Grounded Theory Analysis of Employees’ Perceptions of Physical Activity Participation in Workplace Wellness Programs
dc.typeText
dc.type.genreThesis/Dissertation
dc.contributor.committeememberKovacs, Sara J.
dc.contributor.committeememberButcher-Poffley, Lois A.
dc.contributor.committeememberBlau, Gary J.
dc.description.departmentKinesiology
dc.relation.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.34944/dspace/6486
dc.ada.noteFor Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accommodation, including help with reading this content, please contact scholarshare@temple.edu
dc.description.degreePh.D.
dc.identifier.proqst14453
dc.creator.orcid0000-0003-3578-9403
dc.date.updated2021-05-19T16:10:42Z
refterms.dateFOA2021-05-24T18:48:31Z
dc.identifier.filenameTomlinson_temple_0225E_14453.pdf


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