Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorMao, Connie X.
dc.creatorBunks, Scott
dc.date.accessioned2021-05-24T18:45:27Z
dc.date.available2021-05-24T18:45:27Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12613/6490
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation examines the impact and determinants of government enforcement action related to compliance and corruption. Study I assesses whether Health Care Compliance (HCC) related government enforcement actions are effective at improving firms’ corporate social responsibility (CSR) scores. In a study of 37 enforcement actions, I find that the corporate social responsibility (CSR) score significantly increases during the three years after the enforcement settlement, compared to the period before the enforcement action. In particular, I find that the Diversity and Community CSR sub-scores improve following the enforcement settlement. However, there is little evidence that firms with poorer CSR ratings are more likely subject to enforcement action. Study II expands the reach of enforcement actions beyond the healthcare industry to all firms subject to Foreign Corrupt Practice Act (FCPA) enforcement actions. Based on 88 cases of such enforcement actions, I document increases of the overall CSR scores as well as several sub-scores post enforcement settlement, which is consistent with the results in Study I. I also find that firms start to improve their CSR ratings as soon as the identification of the misconduct occurs, which is on average four years prior to the settlement of the enforcement action. Furthermore, the improvement in CSR rating post misconduct year tends to be greater and more significant among firms that face larger monetary sanctions. This implies that the materiality of enforcement monetary penalties plays a significant role in shaping a firm’s timely response to government investigation of misconduct. Although I find that CSR ratings in Employee Relations and Product are significantly negatively related to the chance of being subject to enforcement action investigation, there is little evidence that firms with poor CSR ratings are more likely to subject to enforcement actions. This finding is consistent with the results from Study I.
dc.format.extent92 pages
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherTemple University. Libraries
dc.relation.ispartofTheses and Dissertations
dc.rightsIN COPYRIGHT- This Rights Statement can be used for an Item that is in copyright. Using this statement implies that the organization making this Item available has determined that the Item is in copyright and either is the rights-holder, has obtained permission from the rights-holder(s) to make their Work(s) available, or makes the Item available under an exception or limitation to copyright (including Fair Use) that entitles it to make the Item available.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectBusiness administration
dc.subjectManagement
dc.subjectBusiness ethics
dc.subjectCorporate social responsibility
dc.subjectEnvironmental social governance
dc.subjectFCPA FCA
dc.subjectGovernment enforcement actions
dc.subjectHealth care compliance
dc.titleARE U.S. GOVERNMENT ENFORCEMENT ACTIONS EFFECTIVE AT IMPROVING BUSINESS ETHICS?
dc.typeText
dc.type.genreThesis/Dissertation
dc.contributor.committeememberBalsam, Steven
dc.contributor.committeememberNaveen, Lalitha
dc.contributor.committeememberEisenstadt, Leora F.
dc.description.departmentBusiness Administration/Interdisciplinary
dc.relation.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.34944/dspace/6472
dc.ada.noteFor Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accommodation, including help with reading this content, please contact scholarshare@temple.edu
dc.description.degreeD.B.A.
dc.identifier.proqst14449
dc.creator.orcid0000-0002-9027-451X
dc.date.updated2021-05-19T16:10:36Z
refterms.dateFOA2021-05-24T18:45:27Z
dc.identifier.filenameBunks_temple_0225E_14449.pdf


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
Bunks_temple_0225E_14449.pdf
Size:
1.071Mb
Format:
PDF

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record