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dc.contributor.advisorSmith, Michael W. (Michael William), 1954-
dc.creatorKesson, Hugh
dc.date.accessioned2021-05-24T18:38:13Z
dc.date.available2021-05-24T18:38:13Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12613/6454
dc.description.abstractIn order to prepare students to read for academic success and informed civic participation, teachers must give students practice in reading for argument in both born digital, printed texts, often digitized to be accessed on digital devices. However, instruction in school remains focused on texts that are not born digital, not least as academic assessments privilege reading for, and writing, argument in conventional, linear forms that do not involve born digital features. The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of an intervention designed to improve the reading and writing of argument of high school seniors at a neighborhood urban public school through focused attention to born digital texts. Through analysis of student performance in formal assessments, and open coding of class activities and stimulated recall interviews, the following research questions were explored: 1. To what extent does a curriculum focused on the writing of academic arguments supplemented by a focus on born digital texts affect students’ writing performance on a college placement test? 2 To what extent does a curriculum focused on the writing of academic arguments supplemented by a focus on born digital texts affect students’ performance on the reading and writing activities in which they engaged as part of that curriculum? Pre and post testing of writing indicated that teaching reading for argument in born digital texts benefitted students in a limited fashion. Analysis of classwork and stimulated recall interviews using an analytic tool that centers on students' construction of readers, texts, contexts, and authors, as well as their deployment of rules of notice offers a more nuanced picture of student reading practices and highlights increasingly sophisticated critical readings in the classroom exposed to born digital texts.
dc.format.extent247 pages
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherTemple University. Libraries
dc.relation.ispartofTheses and Dissertations
dc.rightsIN COPYRIGHT- This Rights Statement can be used for an Item that is in copyright. Using this statement implies that the organization making this Item available has determined that the Item is in copyright and either is the rights-holder, has obtained permission from the rights-holder(s) to make their Work(s) available, or makes the Item available under an exception or limitation to copyright (including Fair Use) that entitles it to make the Item available.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectReading instruction
dc.titleEXAMINING THE INFLUENCE OF TEACHING READING OF BORN DIGITAL TEXTS ON STUDENT READING AND WRITING OF ARGUMENTS
dc.typeText
dc.type.genreThesis/Dissertation
dc.contributor.committeememberBrooks, Wanda M., 1969-
dc.contributor.committeememberTurner, Kristen Hawley
dc.contributor.committeememberFry, Katherine (Katherine G)
dc.contributor.committeememberHan, Insook
dc.description.departmentLiteracy & Learners
dc.relation.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.34944/dspace/6436
dc.ada.noteFor Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accommodation, including help with reading this content, please contact scholarshare@temple.edu
dc.description.degreePh.D.
dc.identifier.proqst14386
dc.date.updated2021-05-19T16:08:22Z
dc.embargo.lift05/19/2022
dc.identifier.filenameKesson_temple_0225E_14386.pdf


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