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dc.contributor.advisorAngel Adaros, Ada Esperanza
dc.creatorMoore, Naomi Sanyika
dc.date.accessioned2021-04-06T13:46:47Z
dc.date.available2021-04-06T13:46:47Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12613/6300
dc.descriptionThis research project was completed as part of the Psychology 3620: Survey Design: From Theory to Practice course.
dc.description.abstractWhile university can be an exciting opportunity for sexual exploration, many young adults come into this experience with inadequate or inconsistent sexual health education and knowledge, and consequently experience negative sexual health outcomes. Universities can play an important role in providing resources that support students’ sexual health and wellbeing, however, this requires meaningful assessment of the students’ needs. Current measures for young adult sexual health and wellbeing are underdeveloped; often too narrow, biomedical, and outdated in their language, existing measures are not meaningful nor are they inclusive. The main objectives of this study were to (a) develop a revised, comprehensive definition of young adult sexual health and wellbeing, and (b) develop a meaningful, relevant measure for sexual health and wellbeing that could provide insight into university students’ needs. The questionnaire development process included creating an original measure for student sexual health, and a pilot study to assess the validity and reliability of the measure. The participants of the pilot study included a sample of 75 students from a small, private international university in Tokyo, Japan. Inter-item reliability analysis was used to assess the reliability for appropriate subscales, while all data was assessed for trends in participants’ experiences. The results of the inter-item reliability showed adequate to good reliability across all relevant subscales. Results showed that most students had received sexual health education during their schooling prior to entering university, and that outside of schooling the internet was, and continues to be, a primary source for sexual health information. While most students reported confidence in expressing consent, notably fewer felt confident with withdrawing consent. Regarding methods of sexual protection, students overwhelming showed comfortability with using condoms, yet were commonly unsure about using any other methods of sexual protection. Finally, while the majority of students acknowledged their sexual experiences affecting their emotional wellbeing, they much less commonly felt comfortable seeking related emotional supported when needed. Results of this study support previous research that the internet is a significant source of sexual health information, and support the benefit of utilizing a comprehensive definition for sexual health and wellbeing. They also provide key insight into directions of improvements that universities can take to provide support for their students’ sexual health. Provided the limited sample size of this study and the limited cross-cultural relevance for this measure, future research should continue include larger samples and consider adapting the measure to be specifically relevant for various cultural backgrounds.
dc.format.extent58 pages
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherTemple University. Libraries
dc.relation.ispartofLivingstone Undergraduate Research Awards
dc.relation.isreferencedbyLivingstone Undergraduate Research Awards website: https://sites.temple.edu/livingstone/2021-livingstone-undergraduate-research-award-in-the-social-sciences/
dc.rightsIN COPYRIGHT- This Rights Statement can be used for an Item that is in copyright. Using this statement implies that the organization making this Item available has determined that the Item is in copyright and either is the rights-holder, has obtained permission from the rights-holder(s) to make their Work(s) available, or makes the Item available under an exception or limitation to copyright (including Fair Use) that entitles it to make the Item available.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectSexual health
dc.subjectSexual wellbeing
dc.subjectQuestionnaire
dc.subjectUniversity students
dc.titleDevelopment of the Student Sexual Health and Wellbeing Questionnaire
dc.typeText
dc.type.genreResearch project
dc.description.departmentPsychology
dc.relation.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.34944/dspace/6282
dc.ada.noteFor Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accommodation, including help with reading this content, please contact scholarshare@temple.edu
dc.description.awardLivingstone Undergraduate Research Award in Social Sciences
dc.description.schoolcollegeTemple University Abroad. Japan Campus
dc.temple.creatorMoore, Naomi Sanyika
refterms.dateFOA2021-04-06T13:46:47Z


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