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dc.creatorStreet, Alexander J.
dc.creatorRuskin, Anglia
dc.creatorFachner, Jörg
dc.creatorMagee, Wendy L.
dc.date.accessioned2021-04-02T16:27:11Z
dc.date.available2021-04-02T16:27:11Z
dc.date.issued2019-05-14
dc.identifier.citationStree, A.J., Fachner, J. & Magee, W.L. (2019). Upper limb rehabilitation in chronic stroke using neurologic music therapy: Two contrasting case studies to inform on treatment delivery and patient suitability. Nordic Journal of Music Therapy, 28:5, 382-404, DOI: 10.1080/08098131.2019.1606848
dc.identifier.issn0809-8131
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.34944/dspace/6266
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12613/6284
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: Therapeutic Instrumental Music Performance (TIMP) is well suited for upper limb rehabilitation following stroke. Published protocols serve to inform clinicians on intervention design and delivery. However, few case studies are available that address patient suitability, protocol modifications to support treatment adherence and suitability of home environment. Methods: Two case studies from a small randomized controlled trial illustrate TIMP protocol modifications and considerations required for home delivery. Qualitative, quantitative and observational data report on participants‘ outcomes and engagement with six weeks of bi-weekly exercises. TIMP adaptations to enhance audio-motor synchronization are described. Results: Outcomes for the less impaired participant with fewer complex health needs were significantly better after six weeks, particularly pinch grip (1 peg in 20 seconds to 15/120). The second participant improved on the water pouring task: 44 seconds to 13.16. Discussion: Severity of stroke and impairment are major factors influencing treatment outcomes. Flexibility in the TIMP protocols, such as emphasizing the underlying pulse and building the dynamic contour, aids treatment adherence and movement synchrony. It is essential to assess homes for access, sound containment and space. Outcome measures for detecting compensatory movement, smoothness and velocity of movement are needed to better inform treatment effects.
dc.format.extent44 pages
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofFaculty/ Researcher Works
dc.relation.haspartNordic Journal of Music Therapy, Vol. 28, Iss. 5
dc.relation.isreferencedbyThis is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in 'Nordic Journal of Music Therapy' on 2019-05-14, available online: https://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/08098131.2019.1606848.
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs CC BY-NC-ND
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.subjectStroke
dc.subjectHemiparesis
dc.subjectMusic therapy
dc.subjectHome care
dc.subjectUpper limb rehabilitation
dc.subjectTIMP
dc.titleUpper limb rehabilitation in chronic stroke using neurologic music therapy: Two contrasting case studies to inform on treatment delivery and patient suitability
dc.typeText
dc.type.genrePost-print
dc.description.departmentMusic Therapy
dc.relation.doihttps://doi.org/10.1080/08098131.2019.1606848
dc.ada.noteFor Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accommodation, including help with reading this content, please contact scholarshare@temple.edu
dc.description.schoolcollegeBoyer College of Music and Dance
dc.creator.orcidMagee|0000-0003-4350-1289
dc.temple.creatorMagee, Wendy L.
refterms.dateFOA2021-04-02T16:27:11Z


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