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dc.creatorRamji-Nogales, Jaya
dc.date.accessioned2021-03-04T20:32:43Z
dc.date.available2021-03-04T20:32:43Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.citationJaya Ramji-Nogales, Bespoke transitional justice at the International Criminal Court, in Contested Justice: The Politics and Practice of International Criminal Court Interventions 106–121 (Christian De Vos, Sara Kendall, & Carsten Stahn eds., 2015).
dc.identifier.isbn978-1-1399-2452-8
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.34944/dspace/6176
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12613/6194
dc.description.abstractThis chapter grapples with the question of whether the International Criminal Court (ICC) should be conceptualised as a mechanism of transitional justice. Most theorists insist that transitional justice is either an inappropriate or an unrealistic goal for the Court. Some scholars have proposed that the Court might more accurately be theorised as seeking to achieve political goals through ‘juridified diplomacy’. Others suggest that the Court should speak to a global, rather than local, audience. A third school of thought criticises international criminal law as insufficiently focused on the preferences of societies affected by mass violence. Going one step further, some theorists suggest that the Court should be set aside in favour of mechanisms that are more responsive to local preferences. Although the incorporation of the ICC into a locally owned transitional justice paradigm faces substantial challenges, this chapter draws on a theory of ‘bespoke transitional justice’ to suggest ways in which this knotty relationship might be better designed.
dc.format.extent16 pages
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofFaculty/ Researcher Works
dc.relation.haspartContested Justice: The Politics and Practice of International Criminal Court Interventions, (Christian De Vos, Sara Kendall, & Carsten Stahn eds., 2015).
dc.relation.isreferencedbyCambridge University Press
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0
dc.titleBespoke Transitional Justice at the International Criminal Court, in Contested Justice: The Politics and Practice of International Criminal Court Interventions
dc.typeText
dc.type.genreBook chapter
dc.relation.doihttps://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9781139924528.007
dc.ada.noteFor Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accommodation, including help with reading this content, please contact scholarshare@temple.edu
dc.description.schoolcollegeTemple University. James E. Beasley School of Law
dc.temple.creatorRamji-Nogales, Jaya
refterms.dateFOA2021-03-04T20:32:43Z


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