Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorReynolds, Alison M.
dc.creatorTurowski, Pamela L.
dc.date.accessioned2020-10-19T16:13:10Z
dc.date.available2020-10-19T16:13:10Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12613/599
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this research was to examine the potential relationship between students’ degree of familiarity with repertoire common to beginning band method books and aural-based music achievement after one year of study. Three research questions guided this study: (1) Which songs from the Familiar Repertoire Survey (FRS) are reported as being the most and least familiar to the sample? (2) For a familiar song, “Lightly Row,” can FRS scores predict (a) Familiar Music Achievement Singing Test (FMAST) scores, (b) Familiar Music Achievement Playing Test (FMAPT) scores, (c) Familiar Music Achievement Improvisation Singing Test (FMAIST) scores, and (d) Familiar Music Achievement Improvisation Playing Test (FMAIPT) scores? (3) For an unfamiliar song, “Finish Line,” can FRS scores predict (a) Unfamiliar Music Achievement Singing Test (UMAST) scores, (b) Unfamiliar Music Achievement Playing Test (UMAPT) scores, (c) Unfamiliar Music Achievement Improvisation Singing Test (UMAIST) scores, and (d) Unfamiliar Music Achievement Improvisation Playing Test (UMAIPT) scores? Participants (N = 17) were fifth and sixth grade students enrolled in their second year of beginning band in a New Jersey elementary school. I created two measurement instruments: FRS, designed to gauge the breadth and depth of students’ familiarity with songs common to beginning band method books, and the Music Achievement Test (MAT) designed to measure aural-based music achievement in singing, playing by ear, and improvising on a familiar and unfamiliar song. In the first session, participants completed FRS by listening to songs common to beginning band books and completing a Likert-type survey on their familiarity with each song. Later, participants watched MAT through an interactive video which prompted them to complete eight musical subtests. I recorded all performances. Judges rated each performance with two rating scales. I analyzed the frequency of responses for each song and found “Hot Cross Buns,” “Jingle Bells,” “Pierrot,” “Lightly Row,” and “London Bridge” to be the most familiar songs. Through linear regressions, I analyzed the ability of FRS to predict MAT scores. I found a significant regression equation between FRS and its ability to predict FMAST scores and UMAIST scores. The current exploratory study contained many limitations which restricts its generalizability to other beginning band populations; however, six conclusions can be made. Familiarity with common beginning band repertoire as represented by a selection of 24 songs common to beginning band method books does not predict students’ achievement (a) singing an unfamiliar song, (b) demonstrating through singing improvisation based on a familiar song, (c) playing by ear a familiar or unfamiliar song, and (d) improvising on an instrument, whether improvising within the context of a familiar or unfamiliar song. Familiarity with common beginning band repertoire does predict students’ achievement (a) singing a familiar song and (b) demonstrating through singing improvisation based on an unfamiliar song.
dc.format.extent206 pages
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherTemple University. Libraries
dc.relation.ispartofTheses and Dissertations
dc.rightsIN COPYRIGHT- This Rights Statement can be used for an Item that is in copyright. Using this statement implies that the organization making this Item available has determined that the Item is in copyright and either is the rights-holder, has obtained permission from the rights-holder(s) to make their Work(s) available, or makes the Item available under an exception or limitation to copyright (including Fair Use) that entitles it to make the Item available.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectEducation, Music
dc.subjectAural-based Instruction
dc.subjectBeginning Band
dc.subjectFamiliar Repertoire
dc.subjectImprovisation
dc.subjectInstrumental Music
dc.titleBeginning Band Students' Familiarity with Method Book Repertoire as Predictor of Music Achievement
dc.typeText
dc.type.genreThesis/Dissertation
dc.contributor.committeememberBuonviri, Nathan
dc.contributor.committeememberConfredo, Deborah A.
dc.contributor.committeememberFolio, Cynthia
dc.contributor.committeememberHattikudur, Shanta
dc.description.departmentMusic Education
dc.relation.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.34944/dspace/581
dc.ada.noteFor Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accommodation, including help with reading this content, please contact scholarshare@temple.edu
dc.description.degreePh.D.
refterms.dateFOA2020-10-19T16:13:10Z


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
TETDEDXTurowski-temple-0225E-1 ...
Size:
6.860Mb
Format:
PDF
Thumbnail
Name:
p245801coll10_482727.xlsx
Size:
40.56Kb
Format:
Microsoft Excel 2007
Description:
Supplemental File
Thumbnail
Name:
p245801coll10_482726.mp3
Size:
28.80Mb
Format:
mp3 audio
Description:
Supplemental File

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record