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dc.contributor.advisorRavi, Sujith
dc.creatorDukes, David
dc.date.accessioned2020-10-19T15:58:11Z
dc.date.available2020-10-19T15:58:11Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12613/596
dc.description.abstractGrasslands provide fundamental ecosystem services in many arid and semi-arid regions of the world, but are experiencing rapid increases in fire activity making them highly susceptible to post-fire accelerated soil erosion by wind. A quantitative assessment that integrates fire-wind erosion feedbacks is therefore needed to account for vegetation change, soil biogeochemical cycling, air quality, and landscape evolution. We investigated the applicability of a novel tracer technique – the use of multiple rare earth elements (REE) - to quantify aeolian soil erosion and to identify sources and sinks of wind-blown sediments in a burned and unburned shrub-grass transition zone in the Chihuahuan desert, NM, USA. Results indicate that the horizontal mass flux of wind-borne sediment increased approximately three times following the fire. The REE-tracer analysis of aeolian sediments shows that an average 88% of the horizontal mass flux in the control area was derived from bare microsites, whereas at the burned site it was derived from shrub and bare microsites, 42% and 39% respectively. The vegetated microsites, which were predominantly sinks of aeolian sediments in the unburned areas, became sediment sources following the fire. The burned areas exhibited a spatial homogenization of sediment tracers, highlighting a potential negative feedback on landscape heterogeneity induced by shrub encroachment into grasslands. Though fires are known to increase aeolian sediment transport, accompanying changes in the sources and sinks of wind-borne sediments likely influence biogeochemical cycling and land degradation dynamics. Our experiment demonstrated that REEs can be used as reliable tracers for field-scale aeolian studies.
dc.format.extent92 pages
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherTemple University. Libraries
dc.relation.ispartofTheses and Dissertations
dc.rightsIN COPYRIGHT- This Rights Statement can be used for an Item that is in copyright. Using this statement implies that the organization making this Item available has determined that the Item is in copyright and either is the rights-holder, has obtained permission from the rights-holder(s) to make their Work(s) available, or makes the Item available under an exception or limitation to copyright (including Fair Use) that entitles it to make the Item available.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectEnvironmental Science
dc.subjectAeolian Transport
dc.subjectDesertification
dc.subjectDrylands
dc.subjectLand Management
dc.subjectRare Earth Element Tracers
dc.subjectShrub Encroachment
dc.titleQuantifying Post-Fire Aeolian Sediment Transport Using Rare Earth Element Tracers
dc.typeText
dc.type.genreThesis/Dissertation
dc.contributor.committeememberGrandstaff, David E.
dc.contributor.committeememberBuynevich, Ilya V. (Ilya Val)
dc.description.departmentGeology
dc.relation.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.34944/dspace/578
dc.ada.noteFor Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accommodation, including help with reading this content, please contact scholarshare@temple.edu
dc.description.degreeM.S.
refterms.dateFOA2020-10-19T15:58:11Z


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